Courses: Previous Semesters

Spring 2007

EXP-0142-S Rastafari: A New World Religion
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04045. Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 208.
The Rastafari movement, which began in Jamaica in the 1930s, has become a global phenomenon, philosophically, culturally, politically, and even economically, via its music, reggae. This course critically investigates Rastafari by paying close attention to its discursive structures.
In this course, we will examine the socio-historical conditions that engendered Rastafari and the contemporary conditions that sustain its growth and attractiveness both to youth in the urban setting and the marginal setting of third world countries. We will approach Rastafari as a form of political and cultural resistance, and investigate such elements as hair politics, gender politics, dread theology, and rasta vibrations. We will also look at the role of Selassie as Savior, Garvey as the Black Moses, and Marley as the Prophet.
Andy Joseph holds a M.S. in Human Development and Psychology from Harvard and aM.T.S. in Theology and Ethics from the Episcopal Divinity School. Rastafarianism was an integral part of his adolescence in St. Lucia, became a source of tremendous conflict and soul-searching during his theological study in Trinidad, and is now an area of interest that inspires him professionally and personally.


EXP-0112-S Science Fiction, Technology, and Society
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03989. Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 224.
Science fiction often seeks to foretell future technological developments, but science fiction also comments on the social evolution of human society.
This course examines the role of science fiction as a powerful vehicle for social and political commentary, especially as it relates to the evolution of the human experience. We will see depictions of the future, address issues about humanity today, and consider what it means to be human in modern society. As well, we will portray science fiction novels in a literary context to bridge the gap between science and the humanities.
Donald Crampton is a lecturer in Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School and a Biochemistry Instructor for the Harvard Extension School. He is a voracious reader with a particular attention to science fiction works. One of his primary interests is combining science along with literature to learn more about the world.

EXP-0120-S Ottoman/Turkish Music Performance
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03997. Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 123.
Ottoman/Turkish music is a rich tradition that has been a major influence in the development of Western music. While analyzing the influence of Ottoman/Turkish music in the compositions of Mozart, Beethoven, Duke Ellington, and many others, the students of this course will perform basic makams (modes) and usuls (rhythmic cycles) of Ottoman/Turkish music. In the end students will find themselves understanding the cultural and musical issues, and trends of Ottoman/Turkish folk, art and religious musical styles. No instrumental experience will be required of the students, however contribution with voice is essential. At times drums will be supplied by the instructor in order to study the usuls.
The course material will include CD's, videotapes, and DVDs, which will put emphasis on the cultural background that the students will need in order to better understand what they will be performing.
This course has been approved by the Music department to count toward the Arts distribution requirement.
Dr. Mehmet Sanlikol is the president of "DUNYA", a non-profit, educational organization dedicated to presenting contemporary view of a wide range of Turkish traditions, alone and in interaction with other world traditions, through performance, publication and other educational activities. Along with his careers as a composer and a jazz pianist, Dr. Sanlikol is a well-known Turkish music singer and an active performer of such instruments as the duduk/mey, zurna, and ud. He holds a Doctoral degree in Composition from New England Conservatory.

EXP-0115-S History of Punk Rock
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03992. Monday and Wednesday 6:00-7:15 PM, Braker 222.
Have you heard of the Sex Pistols, the Dead Kennedys, the Stooges, or the Ramones? Ever wanted to learn the history behind the music: the cultural, political, and aesthetic dimensions that fueled punk rock?
This is a multimedia course designed to give students a new perspective on a once obscure genre that has recently gained renewed momentum and popularity. The class will begin with analysis and discussion of the genre's nascent roots in New York and the Midwest and will then move on to regional music scenes across the United States and Europe, focusing on the evolution of the genre's tour network, sound and design aesthetics. Weekly music assignments will be made available and will be downloadable to an iPod or personal computer.
This course has been approved by the Music department to count toward the Arts distribution requirement. It will also count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Humanities and Arts elective.
Michael Fournier is a music critic and historian who has been involved in the Boston and New Hampshire music scenes since the early 1990s. His book on the Minutemen's "Double Nickels on the Dime" album will be published by Continuum Press in March. His writing has recently appeared in The Boston Globe, Talking River, and Chunklet.

EXP-0145-S Art and Politics: An Insider's View of the Czech "Velvet Revolution"
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04048. Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 224.
Czechoslovakia. 1989. Artists, writers, and filmmakers lead the non-violent overthrow of a Soviet puppet, totalitarian regime. How in the world did they do it?
This course provides students with a very special opportunity to work with someone who was part of this movement. It introduces them to the underground performance, film and video art of the Czechoslovakian "Second Culture." Students will be challenged to transfer the Czech model to their own solo and collaborative public performances. These new works will explore techniques for the empowerment of people without access to mainstream media, will address specific social or political issues in the American present, and will be documented on video.
 For students without extensive experience in video, the course will introduce the basic tools and principles of video production.
This course has been approved by the Art and Art History department to count toward the Arts distribution requirement.
Milan Kohout is originally from the Czech Republic, where he earned a MS in Electrical Engineering. He was an independent artist and became a signatory member of the dissident human rights organization, Charter 77. He was forced by Czech security police to leave his country in 1986 due to his political art activism and was granted asylum in the U.S. He is a member of the Mobius Artists Group, where he has created many full-scale performances, both collaborative and solo. His work concentrates on the subject of human rights and politics.

EXP-0132-S Sketching the Body in Motion: Camcorder, Computer, and Charcoal
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04009. Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Miner 112.
How do we understand and capture the body in motion?
In this course students will explore traditional and new media techniques for capturing the human body in motion. The course will begin with classical drawing and rapid sketch to study human movements. We then transform these drawings into digital and dynamic representations of motion.
Students will be introduced to video, streaming, interactive and performance-based tools for rendering 'motion-portraits'. We will work with our own gestures and narratives, exploring ways to create and capture the range of human dynamics that occur in physical and social space. At the end of the semester, the class will generate a series of "live sketches" which will culminate in a final exhibit on the body in motion.
Nell Breyer is currently a Research Affiliate at MIT's Center for Advanced Visual Studies. Her research explores how we perceive motion. She received her Masters in Cognitive Neuroscience from Oxford University, as well as her Masters in Media Arts & Sciences from MIT. Her work, supported by numerous grants and fellowships, has been presented internationally and in the US.

EXP-0020-S Nazis, Looters, and Indiana Jones: Archaeology in the Public Eye
One Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03967. Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Barnum 114.
In archaeology everyone has an opinion, but are all opinions valid? With so many possibilities for public involvement, it is imperative that an archaeologist understand how and why the public interacts with archaeology.
This course aims to explore the various intersections between archaeology and the public. Topics covered will include: politics and archaeology, the illicit trade in antiquities, marketing heritage and the cultural tourism industry, local archaeologies and indigenous people, the role of museums and museum display, archaeology and the media, and the role of alternative archaeologies.
Christopher O'Connor is a senior at Tufts University majoring in Archaeology and Latin. He has worked at the Archaeological Field School at Poggio Civitate in Tuscany, Italy for the past three summers. His archaeological interests lie in Roman and Etruscan archaeology as well as the intersection between politics and archaeology.

EXP-0124-S Sabermetrics: The Objective Analysis of Baseball
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04001. Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 211.
This course will teach Tufts students the fundamentals of Sabermetrics, the objective analysis of baseball. In addition, the course will cover important concepts in statistics and statistical analysis needed to perform sabermetric research. Students will design and implement their own research study in Sabermetrics. We will discuss baseball, not through conventional wisdom and consensus, but by searching for the truth of baseball performance. Hitting performance, pitching performance, and fielding performance will all be analyzed and better understood with current and historical baseball data.
Andy Andres (Ph.D. N '99) is currently an Assistant Professor of Natural Science at Boston University, a Biology Tutor at Harvard College, a Data Analyst at BaseballHQ.com, and the sometimes third baseman for Jumbo's Peanut Surprise of the Tufts Summer Softball League. He is a die-hard Red Sox fan.

EXP-0118-S Security, Privacy, and Politics in the Computer Age
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03995. Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Braker 222.
Computer viruses, worms, Trojan Horses, spyware, inadequate technology laws, and terrorism. All these issues have a profound affect on our daily computing operations and habits. As well, new technological innovations also have major political and social implications.
This course will consider how such concerns affect us on a daily basis. We will pay particular attention to the impact of electronic voting, Radio Frequency Identification tags, location-based tracking technologies, and the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. We will also delve into reverse engineering software, and how to protect yourself from malicious computer activities. Finally, we will put these issues into a global context to answer the following question: we have dug ourselves into a deep hole; how do we dig out of it? For more information, check out the course web site at http://www.eecs.tufts.edu/~mchow/excollege/s2007/
Ming Chow (E '02) is currently an application developer, technology educator, and webmaster in Boston, Massachusetts. He is also a frequent contributor to the O'Reilly Network, one of the world's foremost technical publishers and is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and USENIX, the advanced computing systems association. He holds a MS in Computer Science from Tufts.

EXP-0138-S Psychopharmacology: Business, Medicine, and the Mind
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04015. Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, East 016.
Do drugs, as well as experience, change the anatomy and chemistry of the brain? Why is there such a stigma attached to mental illness?
In this course we will investigate psychopharmacology both as a big business and a mental health discipline. Topics to be explored include how are psychiatric drugs developed, how research subjects are kept safe, why some personality styles are so difficult to manage, how you interview someone with a psychiatric disorder, and how you refer someone for psychiatric care without giving them the message that they are "crazy." If you are curious about these different aspects of the mind, then you will find this course extremely interesting.
Dr. Charles Morin is the Medical Director of NeuroBehavioral Associates and Principal Investigator for a number of psychopharmacology trials at Coastal Research in Braintree. He is a board-certified psychiatrist who received his medical degree from Brown University and did his psychiatric residency at Dartmouth Medical School.

EXP-0133-S Obesity and Children
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04010. Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 224.
This course will use a multi-faceted approach to look at the obesity epidemic in young people.The goal of this course is to give students a comprehensive knowledge of the scientific, social and political issues which permeate the problem of childhood obesity. We will discuss current and ongoing research in the field as well as look at government run programs with a critical thinking approach. The course will look at initiatives that are succeeding around the country as well as examine case studies in Massachusetts. At the end of the semester students will use their acquired knowledge to come up with recommendations and strategies to reduce childhood obesity.
This course will count as a related course toward the Child Development major. For more information, contact Professor George Scarlett in Child Development, x2248.
Jacqueline Dick is a health and nutrition consultant with twenty years of experience. She is the founder of "Wellness Perspectives" a program that provides educational workshops for teachers and health and nutrition workshops for students. She has been very involved in many federally funded, for profit and non profit health and nutrition programs.

EXP-0122-S The Global Warming Debate
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03999. Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Anderson 208.
Why, despite abundant evidence of the severity of global warming, is American society resisting the changes needed to address the problem?
 This course will first present the theory of global warming and the scientific evidence on which it is based. It will then explore the potential and limitations for addressing the problem through approaches involving personal ethical responsibility and reinvention, religious and environmental values, and artistic creation.
In doing so, we will take a look at how the framing of the issue as a primarily scientific and economic question may have contributed to the problem. We will weigh the argument that a "values-based" approach is needed and explore how religious leaders have begun to discuss global warming as a "stewardship" issue. We will also delve into historical considerations and focusing on the many religious traditions that contain a core of respect for the environment, as well as thinkers as diverse as Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, and J.E. Lovelock all of whom have emphasized the potential for renewal through recognition of the profound connections between people and their environment.
This course can count as a Track III ('environment and society') course, *or* as a Core 3 (social science, or humanities core) toward the Environmental Studies major.
Roy Crystal is an Environmental Scientist with the United States Department of Environmental Protection in the Assistance and Pollution Prevention Unit. He has over 30 years of professional experience in New England, both in government and as a consultant to industry, specializing in water and air quality protection and pollution prevention. In addition, he is a professionally exhibiting landscape photographer.

EXP-0114-S Genetics, Ethics, and Law - On Line/On Campus
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03991. Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 118.
With recent pioneering discoveries in the field of genetics, a Pandora's box of questions has been opened regarding the efficacy and legality of genetic engineering. What are the impacts of such processes as the cloning of the human embryo, DNA testing, and mapping of the human genome?
In this course, we will cover the scientific principles at work in such fields as genetic testing, human genetic defects, assisted reproduction, and biotechnology. At the same time, we will explore the legal and ethical issues raised by these new fields including confidentiality, insurance implications, DNA forensics, informed consent, the future of the Human Genome Project, and genetic screening. In addition, questions about paternity and family law problems involved with fertility engineering and surrogate motherhood will be examined. Finally, we will consider what new roles may emerge for attorneys involved in genetic cases.
This is a "hybrid" course in which students will work both online via Blackboard and in the classroom on the following dates: 1/22 (first class), 2/26, 3/26, and 4/1.
This course has been approved by the Biology Department to count toward the Natural Sciences distribution requirement.
Ronnee Yashon holds degrees in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Education, and Law. She has taught human genetics and general biology, bioethics and the law for more than twenty years. She is also the author of a series, Case Studies in Bioethics, and a book, Landmark Legal Cases for Scientists.

EXP-0134-S Human Rights and Civil Rights, Post 9-11
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04011. Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Terrace Room.
What effect did the 9/11 terrorist attacks have on our civil and human rights?
This course will begin with an introduction to civil and human rights, exploring their origins, the difference between the two, and the central documents that stand behind these two bodies of rights. The class will also explore the tension between our rights and national security. Even if one believes rights should give way in the name of security, there is no denying that our rights have indeed been affected. Topics include: the rights of Muslim-Americans in the United States, prisoners under U.S. custody, immigrants, and U.S. citizens at home and abroad.
Laura Rotolo (J '97 and Fletcher '00) is an attorney who currently works at the ACLU of Massachusetts as a Human Rights Fellow. She was also part of an ACLU team that secured -- through a Freedom of Information Act request and litigation -- the release of thousands of government documents relating to the torture of detainees by American forces abroad.

EXP-0113-S Massachusetts: Controversy, Politics, and the Legislative Process
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03990. Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Terrace Room.
Have you ever wondered how good ideas and sometimes bad ideas become law? What better "laboratory" than the Massachusetts legislature?
This course seeks to provide students with valuable insights into how the process of making laws in Massachusetts really works. It will provide an understanding of why people become frustrated and confused by a system that seems to reward political inertia rather than celebrate creative action. Specific subjects to be discussed include gay marriage, stem cell research, the minimum wage battle, the death penalty, and the expansion of gambling laws in Massachusetts.
This course has been approved to count toward the American Studies major.
Senator Marian Walsh is a Democratic state Senator who serves the Suffolk and Norfolk district. She is in her sixth term in the Massachusetts State Senate and was elevated to the position of Assistant Majority Leader in January 2003.

EXP-0116-S Experimenting with Philanthropy
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03993. Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 223.
If you had the opportunity to provide funding to local nonprofit organizations, how would you make your decision, and why?
This course will address such questions by looking at the needs of the community, goals in giving, the best use of philanthropic resources and the ethical and moral issues involved in giving. Students will be given the responsibility for deciding how to allocate $5000 in private funding to nonprofit organizations in the Tufts partner communities of Medford, Somerville, Chinatown, and Grafton. Working in teams that simulate a foundation board, students will learn the essentials of grant making, and effective philanthropy, and will review and make funding decisions on student proposals written on behalf of local charitable organizations. The course will conclude with the students' presentation of their grant awards to the nonprofit organizations.
This course has been approved to count toward the American Studies major.
Louise Sawyer is a nonprofit consultant with over ten years experience working in the nonprofit community. She recently helped to develop and expand youth philanthropy education programs in the greater Boston area. She received her law degree from Boston College and holds an Executive Certificate in Nonprofit Management from Georgetown's Center for Public and Nonprofit Leadership.

EXP-0041-S Education for Active Citizenship
One Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03972. Friday, 10:30 AM - 1:15 PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene Center.
This course is designed for new Citizenship and Public Service Scholars in the Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service. These students will be introduced to the concepts of civic engagement and active citizenship and will explore the democratic traditions that underlie these ideas. Secondly, students will go through a number of experiential exercises to begin to identify their interests, values and skills related to active citizenship. Third, students will be assigned to and expected to spend approximately three hours per week with an on-going community project. Within this context, students will set personal learning goals as well as goals for the impact they hope to have in the project. Finally, students will be expected to learn about the substance of their issue.
NOTE: This is a mandatory, limited-enrollment course for new Citizenship and Public Service Scholars.
Mindy Nierenberg is the Program Manager at the Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service at Tufts. Prior to joining the TCCPS staff, she was Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Community Partnership at the Massachusetts College of Art.

EXP-0044-S Science Elementary Education Partners
One Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03973. Wednesday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Barnum 114.
Do you enjoy working with young kids, showing them hands-on activities and that learning can be fun? Are you wondering if teaching might be a career for you? This is your chance to work with 1st through 5th graders in one of our host community schools and effect a change in these students!
SEEP is an initiative that emphasizes science experiments and activities to engage young students in their own learning while working with teachers in their classrooms. Tufts students will meet together regularly in a seminar to share experiences, discuss current educational issues, learn effective teaching strategies and work through lots of interesting and fun hands-on science lessons. In addition to the seminar, Tufts students will spend two-to-three hours per week in a host school helping with science activities.
This course represents a partnership between Tisch College and the Experimental College.
Ronnee Yashon holds degrees in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Education, and Law. She has taught human genetics and general biology, bioethics and the law for more than twenty years. She is also the author of a series, Case Studies in Bioethics, and a book, Landmark Legal Cases for Scientists.

EXP-0022-S The U.S. Military: Evolution, Roles, and Current Dilemmas

One Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03969. Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Barnum 114.
The U.S. military has been at the center of the media spotlight ever since 9/11. However, fundamental questions about its nature are often left out of the current discourse.
This course will explore such questions as who are the people that make up its ranks? In what function do the men and women of the armed forces serve in the 120+ foreign countries they are deployed? How much does the military really cost and where does that money go? What jobs can women perform? Will homosexuals ever be allowed to serve?
We will address these questions by studying the US military's historical evolution and present-day roles and structure. Students will examine each of the five branches, the relationship between the uniformed services and the Department of Defense, important moments in military and American history, civil-military relations, and such contentious issues as the appropriate roles of women and homosexuals. Finally, we will apply what we've learned to contextualize and better understand the ongoing conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Peter Maher is a senior at Tufts majoring in International Relations. He is the Co-Founder and Vice-Chair of the Alliance Linking Leaders in Education and the Services (ALLIES), a student-run initiative seeking to bridge the civilian-military gap at the undergraduate level. Peter has conducted independent research in the Balkans, Israel and the West Bank. He also spent this past summer working at the Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies at the National Defense University.
Jesse Sloman is currently a sophomore majoring in Political Science. Before attending Tufts, Jesse taught English for a year in China. At Tufts, Jesse is a member of ALLIES. Jesse's academic interests include military history, security studies, terrorism and counterterrorism, and foreign policy.

EXP-0021-S The Future is Lost: The TV Series as Cultural Phenomenon
One Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03968. Tuesday and Thursday, 7:30-8:45 PM, Barnum 114.
When a plane crashed on more than 18.5 million American television screens in September 2004, a new television show had taken up the mantle of "cult hits." "Lost," seemingly a mix of "Survivor" and "The X-Files," was an instant paradox: a mainstream media blockbuster that defied categorization and appealed to some of the most fringe elements of human nature.
This course will investigate how the show has spawned an empire of entertainment, marketing, and community that eclipses the show itself. We will look at how its producers have pushed "Lost" to the bleeding edge of new media where online communities take pride in dissecting each episode, from literary references to philosophical allusion. And we will see how the show's format has inspired dozens of copycats on networks desperate to adapt to a newly demanding audience.
The course is an interdisciplinary endeavor into the heart of the phenomenon. We'll examine the economic circumstances that led to the development of the show, the societal context that it evolves, and the possible effects of the show on technology and the future of media
Chadwick Matlin is currently a senior majoring in Anthropology and minoring in Communications and Media Studies. Chadwick has been a fan of "Lost" since its debut on ABC.He actively follows Lost's online community searching for information and clues buried in each new episode.

EXP-0051-CS Media Law and Ethics
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03974. Thursday, 1:30-4:00 PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene Center.
Legal and ethical issues have always faced the press. They are as rooted in American history as the trial of John Peter Zenger and published rumors about Thomas Jefferson and as current as contempt charges now facing reporters and controversy over whether a blogger is a journalist.
This course will examine issues of law and ethics that affect journalists and, more importantly, the public that the press is supposed to inform. After reviewing the political, historic and philosophical roots of the First Amendment, the course will present an overview of key issues in press law, including libel, privacy and the free press/fair trial dilemma.
Building on that legal foundation, the course will examine a range of ethical issues, including conflicts of interest, the public's right to know versus an individual's right to privacy, the implications of new technology, and use of anonymous sources. Classroom discussions and exercises will center on actual cases and current events, especially those that show the interrelationship between law and ethics.
This course has been approved to count toward American Studies major credit. It also has been approved to count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Social Sciences elective.
Phil Primack (A '70) is a longtime journalist who has covered politics, the economy and a range of other public policy topics. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, CommonWealth, Boston, and Columbia Journalism Review. He has also been a policy adviser to elected officials, including former congressman, Joseph P. Kennedy, II, and has taught journalism at a number of area universities.

EXP-0052-CS Television in the Age of YouTube
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03975. Monday, 1:30-4:00 PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene Center.
What will television news and information shows of the future look like? What does the era of "see me TV" with its user-generated content mean for public affairs programming?
This course will explore how blogs, vlogs, podcasts, YouTube, wikis, and online social networks are transforming the future of television by creating a new paradigm where consumer control and participation are at the forefront.In addition, students will assess the new trend of "citizen journalism" where the internet enables anyone to become a so-called "authority."
This course has been approved to count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Humanities and Arts elective.
Glenda Manzi is a three-time, Emmy-Award-winning television producer with more than 25 years experience in television, radio, newspapers, and Internet media. She spent the majority of her career working at WGBH-TV, Boston's PBS affiliate, as a news and documentary producer. More recently, Glenda worked as Executive Producer for Botticelli Interactive, an internet new media company founded by M.I.T. graduates.

EXP-0056-CS Making Movies

One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03976. Monday, 4:30-6:50 PM and Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Crane Room.
High Demand - You must attend the first class meeting on Monday, January 22nd in order to be considered.
So you've always dreamed about making movies? Is it easy to envision yourself behind the camera? Wait a minute! Being a filmmaker means learning a variety of crafts and becoming a student of film as well. Can you make the commitment?
This course will immerse students in the practice and logic associated with camera, lighting, audio, and editing -- and in a study of film style -- all in the service of learning how to tell a story cinematically. Working in teams, students will complete a series of small, experimental projects aimed at developing their technical and stylistic facility while, at the same time, engaging in analyses of how filmmakers across the decades and around the world do very similar things in their movies.
The teams will then produce an original, ten-to-fifteen minute "short," each of which will be exhibited at a public screening at semester's end.
This course has been approved to count toward the American Studies major. It will also count as a Humanities and Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor, a Film Studies elective for the Film Studies minor, and Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor.
Howard Woolf is the Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as its Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the Ex College's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is the advisor to TUTV.
Don Schechter (A '01, G '03) is the founder of Charles River Media Group, a Boston-based video production company. He has worked on numerous documentaries, been a key contributor to theExCollege's Producing Films for Social Change course, and taught his own course on the History of Documentary for the ExCollege.

EXP-0099-CS Media Internships
One Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03983.
The Communications and Media Studies program provides academic credit for media-related internships. Students can arrange to work at newspapers, magazines, film companies, advertising and PR firms, or TV and radio stations.
Interns are required to work 150 hours during the semester, keep a journal, and meet biweekly with the Associate Director.
This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies minor as a Film Practice elective.
Please note: enrollment is by consent only.

For more information, contact Susan Eisenhauer, Associate Director of Communications and Media Studies, Miner 13, x72007.

EXP-0101-CS Advanced Filmmaking
Variable credit, Letter-graded, Call #03984.
Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who have completed EXP-0056-S "Making Movies," or who are able to demonstrate equivalent competence can continue their training as filmmakers.
Students who initially qualify will present a "business plan" for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to TuftsFilmWorks' production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. In return, they agree to watch a negotiated number of "source" films, keep a "Producer's Log," and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through and what they feel about the film once it's done.
This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies minor as a Film Practice elective.
Enrollment is by consent.
For information on eligibility, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x7-3384.
Advanced Filmmaking is supported by the generosity of Lisa and Bruce Cohen (J'86 and A'83 respectively) through The Innovation Fund, an initiative designed to extend the entrepreneurial training and creative reach of promising student filmmakers.
Howard Woolf is the Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as its Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the Ex College's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is the advisor to TUTV.

EXP-0102-CS Advanced Electronic and Digital Media
Variable credit, Letter-graded, Call #03985.
Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.
This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor.
Enrollment is by consent only.
For information on eligibility, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x7-3384.
Howard Woolf is the Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as its Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the Ex College's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is the advisor to TUTV.

EXP-0194-CS CMS Senior Project
Variable credit, Letter-graded, Call #03987.
All CMS minors completing their Senior Projects this semester must register for this class.
Julie Dobrow is the Director of the Communications and Media Studies program at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.

EXP-0130-S The Chavez Era: Times of Unrest in Venezuela
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04007. Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 204.
What has Hugo Chavez's advent to power meant for Venezuela? To what extent has the new Venezuelan direction changed power alignments in Latin America and the U.S.?
This course will help to provide and discuss responses to these questions for a student audience interested in global affairs. Nobody doubts that Venezuela has changed profoundly after Hugo Chavez's arrival to power eight years ago. We will also assess the changes that have taken place in Venezuela as well as analyze the circumstances that allow Chavez's brand of leadership to blossom.
Leonardo Vivas is currently the Executive Director of Latin Roots, a non-profit organization dealing with educational aspects and issues of Latinos living in Massachusetts. He has written two books in Spanish regarding both the crisis of democracy in Venezuela and the advent of Hugo Chavez and is currently preparing a third book about the Chavez phenomenon for the American public.

EXP-0123-S The Canadian-American Border: Immigration, Politics, and the Arts
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04000. Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 218.
What is a successful border and how does it evolve? In what ways have borders -- especially that between the U.S. and Canada -- shaped North American identity?
This course will examine the history of borders from the massive French-Canadian immigration to New England in the late 1900s to current Mexican immigration. We will examine such historical events as Great Britain's wars with the US, the Underground Railroad, Vietnam draft dodgers, and post 9/11 defense strategies. Through music, film, literature, popular media and historical texts, we will also look at the cultural differences between Canadians and Americans, and ask why Americans have one of the worst international reputations, and Canadians one of the very best.
This course has been approved by the History department as Humanities Distribution credit.
Deni Bechard is the author of the critically acclaimed novel Vandal Love which tells the story of a Franco-American family during the French-Canadian exodus to New England.He has also written Winter, a memoir and historical study about his own family's history in North America and his father's life of crime in the U.S. and is currently working on Imaginary Wars, a book of non-fiction about the history of the American-Canadian border.

EXP-0091-AS Inquiry Teaching Group
One Continuing Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03979.
Inquiry is a global-issues simulation for high school students from across the country and internationally. It forms an integral part of the year's activities for EPIIC. Students in this course will help design and plan a culminating simulation to be held during the current semester. They will mentor a high school delegation -- helping them understand the materials and issues, as well as preparing them for the simulation. Students in Inquiry will receive one credit for the full academic year.
Steve Cohen is a faculty member in the Education department at Tufts.
Heather Barry is the Associate Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.

EXP-0091-S EPIIC: Global Governance
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03980. Tuesday and Thursday, 3:00-5:45 PM, Crane Room.
EPIIC this year is engaging students in an immersive intellectual journey through such dimensions of global governance as the dilemmas of international terrorism and failed states; the assertion of unilateralism and intervention in great-power foreign policy, whether in Iraq or Chechnya; UN and regional peacekeeping and preventive war; the privatization of war and the militarization of humanitarian space; collective security and expanding nuclear proliferation in India, Iran, South Korea; the global threat of avian flu or other pandemics; proliferating refugee flows and complex humanitarian emergencies; climate change and other environmental challenges; the challenge of the internet; extreme inequities and global poverty; illicit trade, new forms of piracy, corruption, cybercrime, subsidies and international trade; even the challenge of the regulation of genomics and its impact on human evolution.
Please note: this course is a continuation of EXP-0091-F and is primarily for students who successfully completed the EPIIC course last semester.
Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds a M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

EXP-0095-S IGL China Program
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03981.
This is a full-credit, letter-graded course designed primarily as a seminar for students returning from the Tufts Institute for Leadership and International Perspective in Beijing and Hong Kong .
As such, it provides a forum for systematic reflection on that experience. It is open upon petition for other Tufts students seriously interested in the thematic concerns of the program's February symposium. This year's seminar will consider "Asia's Rising Giants: China and India ."
Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds a M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

EXP-0121-S Understanding Guantanamo
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03998. Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 113.
What should the role of the President, Congress, the courts and international law be when it comes to national security? Can the US government deny detainees the protection of the courts, the constitution, and international law?
This course will explore the controversy that surrounds the US prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. It will take students inside the barbed wire of Guantanamo by introducing them to some of the personal lives of those imprisoned on the base and exploring how the US can do a better job of bringing terrorists to justice.
Jeff Gleason is a litigator who for two years has represented six detainees held at Guantanamo in a habeas corpus suit his firm filed on their behalf against the United States government. In the course of his work on this case, he has gained extensive knowledge of the various legal and political issues that the controversial prison has created. Having visited his clients at Guantanamo, he has seen first hand some of the conditions we read about in the papers.

EXP-0131-S Embryos, the Law, and Assisted Reproductive Technology
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04008. Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Terrace Room.
"Where DO parents come from?" Moving at a startling pace since the 1978 birth of the first "test-tube baby," advances in reproductive technology continue to grow and offer options for creating families never dreamed possible even 25 years ago.
This course intends to examine the law and policy behind such techniques as donor eggs, "collaborative reproduction," freezing sperm, eggs, and embryos, the use of surrogates, and pre-implantation genetic testing of embryos (PGD). We will also explore the families such techniques create, as well as the political and ethical tensions they engender.
Susan Crockin (J '76) is the Principal of Crockin Law and Policy Group, LLC, a private law and consulting practice focused on reproductive technology and genetics, embryo law, and adoption, representing individuals, agencies, and institutions involved in these areas. She writes a column for the American Society of Reproductive Technology News and is a consultant to the Genetics and Public Policy Center in Washington DC.

EXP-0119-S Animal Welfare, Animal Rights: Extending the Law

One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03996. Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Aidekman 13. Note: This room is a change from previously published info.
This course examines one of the most important legal frontiers in our time: the criminal and constitutional law surrounding animal welfare and rights.
Topics include animals' legal status in society, how to prevent animal cruelty, the doctrines related to injuries caused by animals, the collection of damages for harm to animals, and how to proceed with an anti-animal cruelty lawsuit. This course will prepare students to think critically and analytically about the relationship between the law, humankind, and animals.
Amanda Willis is an attorney who works extensively with the Animal Law Program at Duke University. Some of her clients include the Animal Legal Defense Fund, PETA, the Humane Society of Greensboro, North Carolina, and the North Carolina and Virginia Voters for Animal Welfare.

EXP-0129-S The Supreme Court in American Life
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04006. Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Anderson 212.
How will the current Supreme Court Justices decide on abortion, physician-assisted suicide, campaign finance reform, drug enforcement, and capital punishment? Why has "handicapping" the vote become a new media "sport"?
This course will begin with an overview of how the Court selects and hears its cases and what, in fact, the Constitutional requirements are for the Court. We will observe the current Court with a weekly check-in on their progress, while delving into the personal, political, and legal history of the institution since its first session in 1790. In addition, we will read several landmark decisions, alongside contemporary media coverage of the issues decided -- including slavery, school desegregation, interracial marriage, contraception, gay rights, war protest, immigration, and more.
This course has been approved to count toward the American Studies major.
Emily Woodward (J '96) is an intellectual property attorney and has worked at several Boston-area biomedical and technology firms. She holds a J.D. from Northeastern University School of Law.

EXP-0140-S The Art and Business of Speech Recognition
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04043. Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Halligan 122.
Hate touch-tone phone systems? Ever talked to a computer? Learn how to make speech-recognition applications that actually work!
In this course, student will design and prototype their own speech-recognition systems. Examples from previous years includes working TiVo you could call to program, a fan-club line for The O.C., a dictionary, a guitar tuner/chord finder, and a trivia game/joke line. Following a real-world, ten-step design process, students will explore how to write a good voice-prompt, how to cast and direct voice talent, and how to program VoiceXML, the industry standard for writing speech-applications.
In addition to producing two speech-recognition applications, students will refine how they write, design, and present ideas, as well as learn to analyze the world around them more critically.
Prerequisites: Having some computer-science or some human factors courses is a plus, but not required.
This course has been approved by the Electrical and Computer Engineering to count toward the Technology Option for Liberal Arts students.
Blade Kotelly (A '95) is Director of Interface Design, Worldwide at Edify Corporation. He is considered a leading authority on speech-recognition interfaces, having designed large scale applications for FedEx, Apple Computer, and United Airlines. He is the author of The Art & Business of Speech Recognition, Addison-Wesley, 2003.

EXP-0085-S Ethical Leadership in Business
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03977. Monday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Braker 113.
What is needed to become a successful leader? Do you need to sell your soul to work in the corporate sector? What are the key issues that impact businesses and individuals, and how can we as leaders effectively deal with them?
In this course, we will explore the changing roles in leadership and collaboration as well as business ethics. It is through engaging leadership and a supporting infrastructure that sustainable results are achieved. Through the use of selected readings, open discussion, and case studies, we will examine key business and organizational issues. In addition, we will learn about our own way of interacting with others and handling ethical dilemmas.
Steve Frigand (A '73) is a business process consultant, and an executive / career coach with over twenty-five years of leadership and change management experience. He has worked with organizations in many different industries and non-profits. He holds a M.B.A. from the Sloan School at MIT.

EXP-0128-S Understanding the Stock Market: History, Structure, and Impact
One Course Credit, Letter-graded, Call #04005. Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 113.
In the 90s, the sky was the limit. NASDAQ was making the mainstream NYSE look old and tired. Then in 2000 the Internet "bubble" hit, and a lot of "experts" lost their shirt and the shirts of thousands who invested in their mutual funds. Does anybody really know what makes the stock market tick?
In this course, students will develop an understanding of the fundamentals of investing, doing so within the realm of larger social, demographic, political and economic contexts. Beginning with a brief historical overview, we will attempt to assess the significance of such key years as 1929, 1973, and 1987. We will then move to a discussion of such themes as the globalization of investing, the relationship between Social Security and the market, socially responsible investing, the critical role that interest rates play, the impact of technology, the mutual fund explosion, the fallout from 9/11, and the recent spate of corporate scandals. Finally, special attention will be paid to the roles that stockbrokers play in the investment process.
Timothy Statford is a financial services professional with nearly two decades of brokerage and stock market experience at such brokerage houses as Shearson Lehman Brothers and Smith Barney Harris and Upham.

EXP-0144-S Pathways to Faith
Half Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04047. Wednesday, 8:00-9:30 PM, Miner 112.
This exploratory interfaith discussion group aims to look at the three major monotheistic faith traditions represented on the Tufts University campus. Focusing on textual sources, both historical and contemporary, this group will examine how faith permeates identity on both a personal and communal level, including an exploration of the cultural issues surrounding religious practices and beliefs. Topics include extremism, reformation movements, and the connection between religion and the state, among others. Questions with broader philosophical underpinnings, such as humankind's relation to the environment, will also be discussed. Emphasis will be on cross-religious themes and comparisons.
Permission of Instructor Required - You should attend the first class meeting in order to be considered.
Shai Fuxman is a doctoral student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, pursuing his studies in Peace Education in the Israeli-Palestinian context.
Christina Safiya Tobias-Nahi holds a Masters degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in bilingual education and cultural and religious diversity issues.

EXP-0143-S Pathways to Understanding

Half Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04046. Wednesday, 6:00-7:30 PM, Miner 112.
This discussion group will be an open forum for students to share opinions and perspectives about the most pertinent issues of today's Middle East and other conflict regions, with the goal of reaching common understandings. The group will engage in in-depth discussions about the complex dynamics of the regions chosen, exploring the perspectives of the different cultures, leaders, and peoples. Our conversations will be informed by historical and contemporary writings from a variety of sources and across disciplines, as well as students' own experiences. While current events will inevitably be part of our discussions, the focus will be on ongoing themes to be selected by the group, such as power dynamics, the role of religion in conflict, nationalism, and the role of third parties in resolving conflict. Students will also plan events to benefit the Tufts community such as speakers' series and panel discussions, as well as a final group project.
Permission of Instructor Required - You should attend the first class meeting in order to be considered.
Shai Fuxman is a doctoral student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, pursuing his studies in Peace Education in the Israeli-Palestinian context.
Christina Safiya Tobias-Nahi holds a Masters degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Education in bilingual education and cultural and religious diversity issues.

EXP-0117-S Quidnunc: Sustainable Development in Nicaragua
Half Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03994. Monday, 6:00-9:00 PM, Braker 225.
This course will provide the members of BUILD (Building Understanding through Learning Development), a student group that travels to Nicaragua over winter break to engage in a community-defined service project, with the opportunity to further their understanding of sustainable developments. The quidnunc will provide students with an interdisciplinary perspective on addressing the health needs of communities in developing nations. Students will develop community-based action plans to address the major health and development issues found in developing nations.
Permission of Instructor Required - You should attend the first class meeting in order to be considered.
This Quidnunc's co-facilitators are Katherine Conway and Sarah Licht, both seniors majoring in International Relations at Tufts.

EXP-0141-S Quidnunc: Conflict Resolution and Cooperative Games

Half Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04044. Wednesday, 9:30-10:30 AM, Miner 110.
What conflict resolution and cooperative games models are out there? How does one fit a curriculum to a community's needs? This quidnuc will study and evaluate existing conflict resolution and cooperative game curricula. The members of the quidnuc aim to develop a sustainable conflict resolution and cooperative game curriculum for multiple grade levels in the Medford Public School district.
Permission of Instructor Required - You should attend the first class meeting in order to be considered.
Allison Bohm, the Quidnunc coordinator, is a senior majoring in Peace and Justice Studies and English at Tufts. She is currently coordinating a Peace Games after-school program in Medford, MA.

EXP-0019-S Research for Success: Using the Library for Thesis and Capstone Projects
Half Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03966. Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 223.
This is an eight-week course.
Are you thinking about writing an honors thesis during your senior year, or are you already preparing to write one? Would you like to get a head start or immediate help in understanding the research process? Would you enjoy sharing what you learn as you become an expert in the subject area you are investigating?
This course will introduce students to the major research tools and search techniques at an intermediate-to-advanced level specific to your subject area. Each will develop a working bibliography of resources as well as a plan for continuing their research.
Regina Raboin is the Science Reference Librarian and Reference Microforms/Current Periodicals Coordinator at Tisch Library.
Laurie Sabol is the Coordinator of Library Instruction at Tisch Library.

EXP-0035 Rape Aggression Defense
Section AS: Half Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04037. Monday, 4:00-6:00 PM, South Hall Basement Lounge.
Section S: Half Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03971.
 Tuesday, 4:00-6:00 PM, South Hall Basement Lounge.
The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked."
 While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so, the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues to be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.
Jessica Bruno and Mark Roche are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors. They will lead the Monday section.
Kerri Dervishian and Darren Weisse are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors. They will lead the Tuesday section.

EXP-0096-S Auditing for Breadth

Variable credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03982.
This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years.
One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits. Please note: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.
For more information about this program and an application, contact Robyn Gittleman at the Experimental College office, Miner Hall, x73384.

EXP-0090-S Methods for Peer Teaching
Two Course Credits, Pass/Fail, Call #03978.
This seminar is designed to guide the teaching done by undergraduates in the Experimental College. Weekly group meetings explore questions of pedagogy, topic-related problems, educational goals, and concerns unique to first-time teachers. This course is open only to undergraduates teaching elective courses.
Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education.

EXP-0192-S Independent Study
Variable Credit, Letter-graded, Call #03986.
By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, Miner Hall, or call us at x73384.

 

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