Courses: Current Courses

Spring 2014 Courses

REGISTRATION for classes will take place on iSIS and will begin at 9:00am on the first day of the spring semester, Wednesday, January 15, 2014.

Registration will continue for open courses until 5:00pm on Thursday, January 30, 2014.

Please check back here for additions and/or changes.

Please check iSIS frequently in the days prior to Registration for call numbers, locations, and other updates.

The page was last updated on 04/14/2014.


EXP-0001-S: American Superheroes: Power, Politics, and Morality
Monday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

The superhero has been a part of American culture since 1938, but in recent years its prominence has grown tremendously thanks to the genre's proliferation in film, on television, and even in traditional fiction.

What does the new-found popularity of superhero narratives tell us about American society at the beginning of the 21st century? What can the evolution of the genre tell us about the ways in which American ideas about power, politics, morality, and heroism have changed over the last seventy-three years? This course will offer students a hands-on approach to the genre through in-depth analysis of prominent graphic novels, films, and traditional fiction. Through a research project, students will use a specific example or element of the genre to come to a greater understanding of how the superhero story reflects and perhaps even shapes the broader American culture.

This course counts as a Humanities and the Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Matthew Pustz is the author of Comic Book Culture: Fanboys and True Believers and the editor of Comic Books and American Cultural History. He received his Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of Iowa and successfully taught this course previously in the Experimental College.


EXP-0004-S: The Corset and the Crown: The History and Politics of Fashion
Thursday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

How do politics and gender perceptions intertwine as both women's and men's roles and fashions seem to be constantly in a state of flux? Why do humans feel the need to change their clothing constantly?

This course looks at changes in Western dress from the age of the Renaissance to the retro trends of today by focusing on issues of body and sexuality as well as political power and global influence. We will examine how clothing acts as a vehicle for political and social meaning. We will both explore everyday meanings related to how we dress and historical concerns embedded in the study of dress -- a venture that is uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between large-scale historical events and the microhistory of individuals and communities.

Alexandra van den Berg (G '12) has worked with the costume collection of the Slater Memorial Museum and the American Textile History Museum. She has sewn historically accurate garments for displays in both institutions. Her recent projects include research in the role of clothing in the aftermath of the French Revolution and hand-sewing a pair of 18th century stays. Alexandra is a recent graduate of the Tufts History and Museum Studies master's program and successfully taught this course previously in the Experimental College.


EXP-0005-S: Translation Practice and Theory
Monday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Are you fluent in a language other than English? Have you ever thought about what it takes to translate a text from, say, French, or Arabic, or Japanese into English? Would you like to learn how it's done?

In this course students will complete three projects: a non-fiction translation, a literary translation, and the subtitling of a video. At the same time, they will read thought-provoking and engaging writing on the subject, including classic texts, current controversies, and questions of translation and power, human rights, and war. The course will be conducted in English, and students may work from any language into English.

NOTE: You should have completed at least Level 4 in your language of choice (or have equivalent experience). Upper level courses and study abroad are a plus.

Ellen Elias-Bursac has been translating Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian writing into English for thirty-five years and has received two national awards. She worked as a language reviser at the War Crimes Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia in The Hague for six years and taught at the Harvard University Slavic Department for ten years. She holds an M.A. and Ph.D. from Zagreb University in Comparative Literature/Philology and successfully taught this course previously in the Experimental College.


EXP-0006-S: Medical Spanish
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This course provides an overview of the practice of Spanish-language medical interpretation. Students will build their skills in communication, ethics, and medical vocabulary, including psychology and psychiatry, while exploring questions of culture and advocacy.

Students will have an opportunity to practice interpretation in a simulated medical setting by emphasizing the following areas: bilingual fluency for social and medical conversation; interpreting skills and techniques; the code of ethics for medical interpreters (in relation to that of doctors); health beliefs and practices in a range of Spanish-speaking cultures; and cross-cultural communications challenges in the medical setting. Instruction is geared toward students with intermediate to advanced language skills, and will reinforce students' prior knowledge of Spanish grammar. This course will be taught in Spanish.

Josep Vicente is currently a medical interpreter with Medical Interpreters of the North Shore. Born and raised in Spain, he holds a degree in Romance Languages and Linguistics from the Universitat de Barcelona and has successfully taught this course a number of times in the Experimental College.


EXP-0007-S: The Phenomenon of Hope: A Multidisciplinary Approach
Thursday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Some people believe hope is the intangible strength that helps us get through our darkest hours. While others feel that hope is to blame for our naive delusions, leading us to wish instead of work for what we want in life.

In this course, we will use philosophy, literature, popular culture, theology, and biological and social sciences to explore the diverse definitions of hope and its potential role in human functioning throughout the life span. Like the proverbial blind monks each touching a part of the elephant, each of these disciplines identifies a part of hope. Our inquiry will bring these pieces together and explore tensions that exist when we take a universal concept like hope and attempt to use it in applications that promote positive human development.

Kristina Callina (G '13) examines the character and leadership development curriculum at the United States Military Academy at West Point through her current role as postdoctoral scholar at the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University. Kristina received her Ph.D. in Child Development from Tufts, where she studied the role of individual strengths, such as hope, in positive youth development.


EXP-0010-S: The Outsider in American Entertainment
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

From Native Americans, African Americans and such immigrant groups as the Irish, the Chinese, and the Jews to drug addicts, sex workers, criminals, freaks, and geeks – this course poses the idea that those outside the dominant culture have been central in the negotiations over national identity since this country's inception. More than anywhere else, this negotiation has taken place to a large part on the stage and screen.

Students in this class will explore this idea by examining popular representations of all the unassimilable members of society that have captured our imagination. Our focus will be on the 19thcentury and the first half of the 20th century, during which time these figures dominated the nation's entertainments. We will also use this history to reflect on modern American culture and on how the fringe figure continues to determine the parameters of our national discourse.

As importantly, we will consider those throughout our history that have rebelled against the label of "outsider" and reclaimed control of their own image through performance.

This course has been provisionally approved by the chair of the Drama department to count toward Art distribution credit — pending final approval by the Academic Review Board. As approvals are finalized, we will publish them here.

Max Shulman is a doctoral fellow in the Drama and Dance Department at Tufts University. His research focuses on how American popular theater functions as a reflection of political and cultural movements. Max previously taught Performance of Radical Politics: 1960 to the Present in the Experimental College.


EXP-0011-S: Explorations in Western Travel Literature
Tuesday and Thursday, 7:30-8:45pm
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading

Why do we travel? How does it feel to be an outsider? Can you ever go home again?

In this course, students will explore these and other major questions through the study of travel literature—the stories of individuals traveling and living in foreign lands. Travel literature, spanning countries, time, and media, will serve as our foundation for describing and understanding the common themes uniting travelers. In travel literature, the narrators often reveal something new about places traveled as well as revelations within their own lives. By the end of this class, students will be ready to engage in their own adventures!

Andrew Hunter is a senior at Tufts majoring in Political Science and minoring in English. Andrew spent his junior year abroad in London, and he traveled and hiked through many areas of Western Europe.


EXP-0012-S: The Art of Money
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This course will explore the intersection of art history and economics through the development and expansion of capitalism in the West. In what ways are aesthetic and monetary values related? Do economic and artistic circulation mirror one another? How have artists given pictorial form to speculation, trading, and other abstract processes? How have the aesthetic concerns of finance evolved with the shift from gold to cash to credit?

Our topics of investigation will include the visual culture of money, the aesthetic concerns of economics, artworks about or of money, and the economics of art production. Classes will address the themes of value, labor, market, counterfeiting, consumption, reproduction, and circulation—concerns which penetrated both the visual and economic spheres and marked both art and economics as complex and often abstract systems of representation.

This course has been provisionally approved by the chair of the Art and Art History department to count toward Art distribution credit — pending final approval by the Academic Review Board. As approvals are finalized, we will publish them here.

Maggie Cao is a Ph.D. candidate in Art history at Harvard University. Her work has appeared in the journal American Art as well as exhibition catalogues on American painting. She is currently finishing a dissertation entitled "Episodes at the End of the Landscape," which examines the failure of American landscape painting in the late-19th century. Her next project will focus on the interconnected artistic, corporeal, and economic meanings of consumption in the 19th century.


EXP-0014-S: 2D Animation
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

From Saturday morning cartoons to the Disney classics to such fixtures of contemporary culture as The Simpsons, South Park, and Family Guy, animation fascinates young and old. But how is it made? And is it something you could do?

This course will teach students all the fundamental skills needed to create classic 2D character animation. These include character design and development, storytelling, acting, timing, facial expressions and emotion, and making characters walk and talk. We will cover how to compose scenes and create backgrounds, the use of color, and more. We will primarily work in Adobe Flash and Photoshop, employing "keys and in-betweens," techniques used by practicing professionals. The history of animation and current industry trends will also be discussed.

Students will complete numerous projects, including a fully-animated short film with sound.

These skills are also useful for 3D and experimental animation, filmmaking, illustration and design.

This course has been provisionally approved by the chair of the Art and Art History department to count toward Art distribution credit — pending final approval by the Academic Review Board. As approvals are finalized, we will publish them here.

This course also counts as a Media Practice elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor and as a Film Practice elective for the Film Studies minor.

Please Note: Students will need to have a Wacom tablet to take the course. The Intuos Pen model (widely available online for $79) is Wacom's entry level unit. The Intuos Pen and Touch Medium (available from Amazon for $185 including free shipping) is the preferred size for drawing animation. But it is not required. Tablets may also be found used online at further discount.

Gabriel Polonsky is an Emmy-nominated animation director, producer, and designer with over twenty years of professional experience, including on-air promos for the Cartoon Network, SyFy Live and Discovery Channels, national commercials for Volkswagen and CVS, and character designs for Miramax Feature films. He specializes in 2D, stop motion and clay animation, mixed-media, and live action.


EXP-0021-S: Is the Nook a Book?
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15pm
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading

People have been predicting "the end of the book" for hundreds of years. In our current technological landscape, is the written word truly in more peril than ever? If so, do we care?

This course will explore the relationship between technology, reading, and writing. Students will move beyond a simple "screen versus paper" framework in order to focus our inquiry on the particular. Instead of raising questions like "are e-readers ruining books?" students will ask questions llike "what might make an e-reader the right option for certain kinds of reading?" We will consider a range of problems, both practical and philosophical, posed to readers and writers by contemporary technology. Is there inherent value in the deep attention traditionally associated with reading a book? Why use words to communicate when a single Snapchat could be worth a thousand? Recently, studies point to literary fiction's ability to make us more empathetic—but is the idea that fiction should have a function in the first place just another symptom of our modern impulse to quantify?

This in-depth consideration of technology's impact on a particular part of our lives will provide students with tools for approaching other points of friction between their values as human beings and "what technology wants"—a skill that will become increasingly important as technology continues to permeate more and more of the human experience.

Alexandra Allport is a senior at Tufts majoring in English and French.

Emily Carlin is a senior at Tufts majoring in Cognitive and Brain Science.


EXP-0023-S: Kids and Computers: Exploring Educational Technology, Apps, and Games
Monday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

The impacts of computing and our networked culture on children and adolescents are profound and potentially very valuable.

This course will allow students to focus on one key aspect of this phenomenon: to be designers, players, educators, and critics of all things T.A.G.—Technology, Applications, and Games. Throughout the semester, we will explore innovative T.A.G.s, and through a child development lens, we will critically evaluate commercially available forms of T.A.G. and discuss trends in the rising educational technology movement. Students will experience T.A.G.s in museum and lab settings, meet with industry professionals and teachers, and enjoy the "hard fun" of playing and learning with T.A.G.s.

The semester will culminate in a long-term workshop oriented project, in which students will create an evaluation rubric or a playable T.A.G prototype of their own design.

Amanda Strawhacker (G '13) currently works with the DevTech Research Group where she has collaborated and coordinated for various National Science Foundation-funded projects. She is a research analyst focusing on designing, implementing, and evaluating developmentally-appropriate technology for young children. Amanda earned her M.A. in Child Development at Tufts University, concentrating in Children and New Technologies.

Amanda Sullivan (G '12) is pursuing her Ph.D. in Child Development at Tufts University. Her graduate research broadly examines the role of new technologies in the lives of children. She has been a Graduate Research Assistant with the DevTech Research Group for the past three years where she has collaborated on multiple National Science Foundation-funded projects related to EdTech. Amanda also holds an M.A. in Child Development.


EXP-0025-S: The Mind's Eye: Neuroscience in the Movies
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Neo uploading Kung Fu to his mind. Cobb incepting an idea within a dream. Tyler Durden's true alter-ego. Jason Bourne's high-octane amnesia. Hollywood has fallen in love with the brain!

The aim of this course is to learn the broad principles of brain science and then apply this knowledge to tease out what Hollywood often gets right or wrong. We will focus on the recent spate of films made with neuro-scientific backdrops. In doing so, we will test the accuracy of a common thread that ties these movies together: the idea that the brain is the mind's physical substrate through which ideas, memories, and personalities can be artificially enhanced or distorted.

At the same time, we will explore whether or not neuroscience is reaching a point where questions are rapidly being plucked from the tree of science fiction film and grounded in experimental reality. Topics of special interest include memory erasure and reactivation, drug addiction, behavioral control, and impaired cognition.

This course counts as a Humanities and the Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor and as a Film Criticism elective for the Film Studies minor.

Emily Hueske holds a Ph.D. in Brain and Cognitive Sciences from M.I.T. Her research ranges from the brain's dopaminergic reward system and its role in decision-making to a revolutionary set of tools in neuroscience known as optogenetics. She has published in the journals Nature Neuroscience, Journal of Neuroscience, and Genetics.

Steve Ramirez is a Ph.D. candidate at MIT in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences. His research focuses on finding, activating, erasing, and artificially modifying memories in the brain. Steve's pioneering work has been published in Nature and Science, and he recently gave a TED talk about his work on memory manipulation. His projects have received wide media coverage by The New York Times, BBC, Guardian, CNN, The Economics, and Time.


EXP-0027-S: YouTube: Business and Creative Success
Tuesday and Thursday, 7:30-8:45pm
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading

Online content production has never bigger, and is only getting larger. From the basic best practices to larger picture strategy, monetization, branding and beyond, this course aims to not only create YouTube videos but to succeed and grow. YouTube content creators practice a wide range of skills from creativity and marketing to business research and more. Students are expected to become independent creators themselves and are encouraged to bring their own ideas and inspiration to the classroom.

This course will cover a wide range of topics, and many will be applicable to other activities. Topics will include: recording and editing, search engine optimization, social media management, brand growth and strategy, business negotiations, advertising and monetization, and more. Grading will be based on self-guided projects, research, and in class engagement.

Kyle Shurtleff has been creating gaming YouTube videos for over a year. He has published over 250 videos for more than 10 million total views, and over 100 years of watch time to date. His channel currently has over 85,000 subscribers and even landed him a job. Kyle is a senior majoring in Engineering Psychology.


EXP-0033-S: Community Emergency Response Team
Tuesday, 4:30-5:45pm

0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

The C-CERT course provides students with the skills required by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to serve as a Community Emergency Response Team member within their campus community. Completion of this training will provide the student with the basic skills they may need in the aftermath of a disaster or other emergency and the opportunity to assist the Tufts Community and the Department of Public Safety by joining Tufts C-CERT. By working together, C-CERT members can assist in saving lives and protecting property using the skills gained in this course. This course meets FEMA and Emergency Management Institute (EMI) requirements for CERT training.

Mark Roche is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and a certified CERT Instructor. He also serves as a CERT Team Leader and Operations Captain with a local Emergency Management agency. He is currently an instructor for the Experimental College teaching the Rape Aggression Defense for Women and Advanced Rape Aggression Defense courses.

Matthew Hart is a Continuity Planning Specialist in the Department of Public & Environmental Safety. In this role he assists departments across the university in developing their own plans to cope with emergencies and disasters. He received a B.S. in emergency management from Massachusetts Maritime Academy and has earned the Associate Emergency Manager credential through the International Association of Emergency Managers.


EXP-0035-AS: Rape Aggression Defense
Monday, 4:30-6:30pm
0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self-defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Mark Roche and Kerri Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.


EXP-0035-BS: Rape Aggression Defense
Thursday, 4:30-6:30pm
0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self-defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Darren Weisse is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and a certified R.A.D. instructor.


EXP-0036-S: Advanced Rape Aggression Defense
Monday, 6:30-8:30pm
0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

Advanced Rape Aggression Defense (Advanced RAD) is a continuation of the Basic program and answers a lot of the "what if" questions. The program will begin with a review of the basic program followed by simulation. This course is more hands on than the basic program and includes topics such as defending against multiple attackers and defense against weapons such as knives and guns. Throughout the course, the instructors will conduct realistic simulation training using impact targets and facilitate discussions on sexual assault, crime prevention and personal protection.

Mark Roche and Kerri Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.


EXP-0040-S: Positive Psychology: Theory and Application
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Strange as it may seem, science has lately turned its lens toward what makes us happy and how we can live well.

This class will introduce students to the field where much of this work is being done, that of Positive Psychology, and will begin to familiarize them with the research behind the science of happiness. We will focus on interventions that have been proven to impact the growth and development of college students and will require students to practice new strategies to make them happier. Course topics will include (but are not limited to) the study of character strengths, the science of happiness, goal setting, optimism, gratitude, and science-based positive psychology interventions.

Deb Levy was the Head Teaching Fellow in Professor Tal Ben-Shahar's extremely popular Positive Psychology course from 2007-2009 in the Psychology Department at Harvard University. Currently she specializes in coaching individuals and businesses, and her clients have included Tufts University Health Services, the MIT Center for Work and Family Life, the Harvard University Divinity School, and the University of Maine women's basketball team. She has successfully taught this course a number of times in the Experimental College.


EXP-0041-S: Education 4 Active Citizenship
Friday, 10:30am-1:15pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This course is specifically designed to prepare first year students for the Tisch Scholars Program. Only students who have been pre-selected for the E4AC program are permitted to enroll. In this course, students will begin to build a framework for civic engagement. Through selected readings, class discussions, guest speakers, and experiential work, students will think about how change is created in a community-based setting. In order to be effective as college student agents for change as well as lifelong active citizens, class members will study the relationships between Tufts University and its host communities. Students will become familiar with both historical and current issues facing these communities and ways in which Tufts students and community residents are making a difference.

Please Note: Only students who have been pre-selected for the E4AC program are permitted to enroll.

Dave Harker is a Doctoral Candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Sociology Department at Boston College. His primary research interests include political sociology, inequality, social movements, and civic engagement. Dave's dissertation work explores the ways in which long-term volunteers attach social and political meaning to their work.


EXP-0042-S: The Right to Privacy in Modern America
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

An individual's right to marry? A woman's right to choose? Warrantless wiretapping? The right to bear arms? The right to die?

Each and every one of these issues, and far more, have arisen before the United States Supreme Court in recent years, expanding and contracting the breadth and scope of our right to privacy. Even in a new era of government, the scope of the right to privacy remains at the forefront of the collective American conscience.

This course will explore how Constitutional law has shaped the nature of the right to privacy and how the right may be evolving in modern America. We will concentrate on three particular areas: (1) privacy rights specifically enumerated in the Constitution, (2) privacy rights that have been read into the constitution, and (3) emerging ideas that may necessitate the extension or expansion of historically-established concepts of privacy.

Douglas Martland is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice Gary Katzmann of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts.

Steve Sharobem is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice William Cowin of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts.

This course has been successfully taught a number of times in the Experimental College.


EXP-0044-S: Contemporary Issues in Transgender Studies
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This course explores the intersection between gender and sex. How do they affect identity? Is gender biological, socially constructed, or both?

By exploring contemporary transgender issues we will consider these questions along with the way in which gender non-conformity challenges social conceptions of gender. This course is designed to be experiential in nature, utilizing academic research, current events, film, art, and popular culture to explore gender and transgender issues. Special attention will be given to "lived experience" vs. "expertise" and students will be invited to challenge themselves to think critically and to share their process of exploration. Students will investigate through service learning and community engagement. Guest speakers and documentary interviews will be utilized to maintain the emphasis on experience.

Ladawn Sheffield is the co-founder of Camp Odyssey, a social justice and diversity camp in Oregon, where youths are engaged in discussion on racism, sexism, and heterosexism. She is a clinical therapist at a residential substance abuse program for adolescent boys and has also held a Clinical Internship at the Sexual and Gender Youth Minority Resource Center in Portland, Oregon working with LGBTQ youth and adults.


EXP-0046-S: Experimenting with Philanthropy
Wednesday. 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Want to be an agent for community change? Wish you had money to give away to your favorite organization?

Working with a grant from the Highland Street Foundation, students in this course will have the opportunity to be philanthropists by serving as a youth board to award $10,000 in funding to local nonprofits of their choosing. Students will learn about the different types of, and approaches to, philanthropic giving, as well as the key elements of effective nonprofit management and sustainability. Students will also have the opportunity to conduct their own community project.

This course is supported by a grant from the Highland Street Foundation.

Nancy Lippe is the Associate Director of Civic Schools, a local Boston effort to reconnect schools with their civic mission, and she has led youth programs in schools and communities for the last fifteen years. Prior to moving to Boston, she worked as a program officer for a small community foundation in the San Francisco Bay Area, promoting youth programs, local philanthropy and connecting donors with local programs. Her work has involved being both a grant seeker and a grant maker, resulting in a great appreciation for the opportunities and challenges of both sides. She holds a doctorate in education from the Fielding Graduate University. She has taught this course previously in the Experimental College.


EXP-0047-S: "Obamacare" and Everyday America
Thursday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

The news media and political punditry constantly bring us both praise and criticism of the Affordable Care Act ("Obamacare")—but what does the law actually do for American residents?

The first half of this course will place our healthcare system within a global context before exploring the historical origins of our current reform efforts, how our past healthcare system worked (or did not work) for American residents, and how public opinion and legal challenges have shaped the rollout of the ACA. The second half of the class will explore health reform with a focus on examining its impact on diverse groups of ordinary U.S. residents, including low-income Americans, women, the mentally ill, immigrants, health care providers, and small employers. We will also discuss how "big business" such as insurers and pharmaceutical companies operate within the health reform environment, with a focus on the consequences for ordinary people.

The course will encourage students to think critically about the strengths and flaws of our current health care system and to explore and debate laws and policies to fill in identified gaps in health care reform. We will encourage debate and discussion from all perspectives about U.S. health and public health law and policy choices, and we will emphasize participation and dialogue through frequent interactive activities, including role-plays, mock debates, and class discussions.

Maggie Morgan currently works as a Clinical Fellow at the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation at the Harvard Law School. Maggie also leads a 4-year diabetes policy project in North Carolina, collaborates with coalitions of community health workers and pharmacists to find sustainable funding sources for their valuable primary care work, and works to expand the Center's focus to include more projects on immigrant health. Maggie holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School and an M.A. in International Relations from the University of Chicago.

Katherine Record currently works as a Senior Clinical Fellow at the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation at the Harvard Law School. Katherine also advises the Massachusetts Executive Office of Health and Human Services on implementing a state-wide electronic medical record transfer system and oversees Harvard Law students pursuing mental health policy reform in the Mississippi Delta and within the Center. Katherine received her J.D. and M.A. in Psychology from Duke University and her M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health.


EXP-0048-S: The Politics of Drug Prohibition
Monday and Wednesday, 7:30-8:45pm
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading

Less than a century ago, heroin was available for legal purchase in local groceries, but alcohol was prohibited. Today, the opposite is true, and many drugs are illegal that once were not. What has this policy, commonly referred to as prohibition, wrought?

This course will thoroughly examine the history of drug policy, focusing on currently illicit drugs. We will learn about the motivations that influenced drug prohibition movements and legislation, and examine the declarations of our government's "War on Drugs." We will approach American drug prohibition as a social structure, and examine its impact on our society. We will focus on areas including criminal justice, povety, race, and class relations, mass incarcerations, medicine, education, and the global drug trade. Students will come away from this course with a nuanced and informed understanding of drug policy, its history, and its implications.

Jonathan Green is a junior at Tufts majoring in Philosophy and American Studies. His academic foci include the criminal justice system and drug policy, and he is particularly interested in the hidden histories of drug prohibition and the American-led global "War on Drubgs." He is a former president of the Tufts chapter of Students for Sensible Drug Policy, and has written a column for the Tufts Daily in which he covers news from the criminal justice system.

Lauren Traitz is a senior at Tufts majoring in Philosophy and Political Science. She helped to found the Tufts chapter of Students for Sensible Drug Policy and held a presidential position in the group for two years. She currently holds an internship at the non-profit organization Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP) and would like to continue working on drug policy issues after she graduates.


EXP-0050-CS: Social Media: Participatory Culture and Content Creation in Society
Wednesday. 6:30-9:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

The proliferation of social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter and more) has created a dramatic increase in the ways individuals can define themselves, engage with others, develop communities, tell their stories and exert their influence. As more of our daily lives are spent on social media platforms with their own community practices and norms, it is imperative to reflect critically on how social media changes our relationships to each other and society. In just the last 20 years the Internet has given individuals the power of worldwide distribution of content, instantly, for free, disrupting traditional forms media and communications, creating new forms of interpersonal and civic engagement.

This course will examine this particular form of "new media" and how it is shaping our world from a critical point of view. Students will examine a variety of areas in which social media has created widespread change, and will debate the opportunities and challenges of communicating on social media platforms and explore their cultural significance.

Jesse Littlewood is a digital strategist with EchoDitto, a Somerville-based firm that consults with non-profits, government agencies and socially responsible businesses. EchoDitto helps these groups effectively use online technology to meet their goals by drawing on digital advertising, engagement marketing, online membership building, fundraising and social media dynamics.


EXP-0051-CS: Advanced Narrative and Documentary Practice
Wednesday, 4:00-6:30pm; Friday, 9:30am-12:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Narrative and Documentary Practice taught last fall in the Experimental College.

Each student will produce his or her proposed story under the individual guidance of the instructor. Student projects can employ a wide range of storytelling styles, including but not limited to investigative, historical, biographical, and autobiographical. They can address significant social, economic, political, and environmental issues, as well as capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The students will work closely with the instructor and other practitioners, constantly crafting and editing their projects and developing their own unique voice. Each project will be scrutinized for thorough and accurate research, original and ethically grounded reporting, and engaging storytelling. At the end of the semester, the stories will be published on the web. In addition, students will have regular opportunities to meet collectively, engage in peer review, and share stylistic and workflow strategies.

Please Note: While this course is designed as the logical next step for students who've completed the introductory level class in the fall, individuals who did not participate in the fall class may contact the instructor to determine whether or not they have the necessary preparation for joining this semester.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an elective.

Gary Knight is a renowned photojournalist whose work – from South East Asia to Yugoslavia to Iraq and Afghanistan – has been published, exhibited and honored around the world. He is a founding member of the VII Photo Agency, dispatches magazine, and the Angkor Photo Festival. He is currently the Tufts' Institute for Global Leadership's Exposure INSPIRE Fellow.


EXP-0052-S: On the Record: Communicating for the Government
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

"What the President really meant by those remarks . . ."

This course will explore the making of public policy through government press and communications operations and the dissemination of an administration's message. We will also examine the history behind official briefings and the mechanics of government press operations in an ever-changing media environment that now includes citizen journalists and social media.

In addition, students will learn how to prepare for a briefing; handle crisis communications; and how to deliver technical information in a compelling way. Students will also learn about serving clients and constituencies and how to balance competing interests. Finally, students will learn best practices and lessons learned in public communication. Students will be required to write communications strategy plans and prepare an overall memorandum for an incoming administration.

This course counts as a Humanities and the Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Nanda Chitre has served in the Clinton and Obama Administrations as an on-the-record spokesperson. She was Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Press Secretary to President Clinton. Nanda has also worked on the NBC series The West Wing. Most recently, Nanda served as Acting Director for Public Affairs at the U.S. Department of Justice and as a Senior Advisor at the U.S. State Department. Nanda is a graduate of Tufts University.


EXP-0053-S: Experimental Documentary Film: Aesthetics and Production
Monday and Wednesday, 4:30-5:45pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Experimental documentary film is not a standard category of film theory or criticism, but arguably it should be. Certainly there are well known examples of films that blur the distinction between conventional documentaries and narrative fiction films (Dusan Makavejev, WR: Mysteries of the Organism) and documentary and myth (Isaas Julien, Ten Thousand Waves), and Werner Herzog's documentary Fata Morgana has been described as a "political science-fiction movie." More recently many if not most music videos combine documentary footage of a performance with narrative fiction. Even the idea that films tend to fall into two categories such as documentary and fiction looks suspect if we consider the range of films that fall outside the contemporary mainstream. Indeed the concept of performance and the idea that the raw material of film is not a representation of reality but reality itself seem almost inevitably to undermine the distinction. Films as diverse as Louis Malle's My Dinner with Andre, Werner Herzog's Fitzcarraldo, and Matthew Barney's Cremaster Cycle illustrate the first point, and avant-garde and art films that foreground their own concrete conditions of production, realization, and reception generalize it.

This course will be co-taught by a professional filmmaker (Patrick Johnson) and a philosopher (Stephen White), and we will draw on the resources of the Experimental College and Tufts' Digital Design Studio. We will take both the history and current practice of experimental filmmaking as our inspiration in the production of experimental short films with equipment that includes camcorders, DSLR cameras, and iPhones. We will also draw on a range of sources outside film, including contemporary graphic novels, manga, and recent developments in experimental literature, and performance and installation art.

This course counts as a Media Practice elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor, as a Film Practice elective for the Film Studies minor, and Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor.

Stephen White is Professor of Philosophy at Tufts. Along with film, his research interests include philosophy of mind, epistemology, meta-ethics, and aesthetics.

Patrick Johnson is Assistant Professor of Filmmaking at Wheaton College.


EXP-0054-S: Eight Hundred Words
Thursday, 5:30-8:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

In this course – taught by the former editor of the European Edition of Time magazine – we will investigate where good feature ideas come from; explore how to conceptualize, organize and structure those ideas through journalistic narrative; and experiment in an intensive workshop environment with a variety of story types – the profile, the reported essay, the "trend" piece. Students will receive a thorough grounding in the fundamentals of feature writing: researching, reporting, interviewing, writing – and re-writing.

In addition, we will do close readings of published features and focus on how words work – and how we work with words – by reading essays on language and writing from the likes of George Orwell, Virginia Woolf, and Stephen King. The emphasis throughout is on smart journalistic thinking, detailed reporting and fine narrative writing – regardless of whether one's work is intended to run in a newspaper, magazine, or website.

This course counts as a Media Practice elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

This course is part of the Program for Narrative and Documentary Practice in the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.

James Geary is the Deputy Curator of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University, where he edits Nieman Reports and oversees other Nieman online and print publications. A 2012 Nieman Fellow, he is the former editor of the European edition of Timeand was the founding editor-in-chief of The World Weekly, a new international print news magazine made up of original journalism and syndicated content from publications around the world.


EXP-0055-CS: Multiplatform Journalism for the 21st Century
Monday, 1:30-4:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

What makes for a good story? How do you decide which media form will allow you to tell it best? And what are the skills that will be most important to journalists as they adapt to the needs of tomorrow?

Technology has transformed journalism into a genuinely multimedia enterprise, allowing journalists at every level to tell stories using a variety of media. Still, the primary responsibility of the journalist remains unchanged: To search for accurate information, digest and distill it, and then convey it compellingly. It's just that these days there's a lot more information to contend with, and a lot more decisions to make on how it can be conveyed best. In this course, you'll learn by doing. You will serve as truth-seekers in digging up stories that seek to make sense of the world around us, and then hone your skills as multimedia storytellers, working across a variety of platforms – print, broadcast, video and other Internet media. You'll also learn from a collection of award-winning guest speakers who are doing innovative work in journalism, across a variety of platforms.

This course counts as a Media Practice elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Anthony Everett (A '83) is a multiple Emmy and National Headliner Award recipient who currently hosts Chronicle, the nightly television news magazine of WCVB-TV, the ABC affiliate in Boston. Anthony has been a broadcast journalist since 1984 and has covered news, politics, and human interest stories across America and the world. Anthony is a graduate of Tufts University and former editor-in-chief of The Tufts Daily.

Neil Swidey (A '91) is a Boston Globe Magazine staff writer whose work has been featured in The Best American Science Writing, The Best American Crime Writing, and The Best American Political Writing. His video journalism has been nominated for an Emmy Award, and he has served as a news consultant and on-air analyst for NBC News. He is the author of The Assist, a Washington Post best book of the year, and co-author of the New York Times bestseller Last Lion: The Fall and Rise of Ted Kennedy.


EXP-0056-CS: Making Movies
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-9:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

What does it take to be a filmmaker? Are you ready to make the commitment?

This course will immerse students in the practice and logic associated with camera, lighting, audio and editing – all in the service of learning how to tell a story cinematically. Working in teams, students will complete a series of small projects aimed at developing their technical and stylistic skills. At the same time, they will engage in analyses of filmmakers whose styles and methods are not far removed from that of the class. The teams will then produce original short features, the last of which will be exhibited in a public screening at semester's end.

This course counts as a Media Practice elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor and as a Film Practice elective for the Film Studies minor.

HIGH DEMAND. In order to be considered for enrollment, you MUST attend the first class meeting at 6:00pm on Thursday, January 16, in Braker 001.

Don Schechter (A '01, M '03) is the founder of Charles River Media Group, a Boston-based production company. He is currently co-producer, cinematographer, editor, and composer for an independent feature film called Marranos and has worked on numerous projects for such clients as The Rolling Stones, A&E, NBC, and The New York Times. Segments from his recent award-winning documentary, A Good Whack, were aired on MSNBC and the BBC.


EXP-0057-CS: Inside Women's Magazines: From Ladies Home Journal to Bitch and Beyond
Monday, 6:30-9:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Women's magazines are some of the highest-circulation publications in the country with a robust count of ad pages, yet they have long been denied respect and accused of not producing "serious" journalism. This new course will examine women's magazines and their formula, their history back to the 1870s, their role in society and women's movements, and their future in print and online.

Our focus will be all national publications tailored to women—from fashion magazines such as Vogue to service titles like Ladies Home Journal and O, The Oprah Magazine to feminist offering such as Ms. and Bitch. We will examine the publishing formula these magazines have in common, their look, their challenges, their editors-in-chief, their readers, and their embrace of digital media. We will explore these publications' role in popular culture and in movements concerning Obamacare, abortion, women in combat, equal pay, and other issues. This course will incorporate both academic and practical learning components, allowing students to earn an intimate understanding of what it's like to work for a women's magazine and be ready to pitch story ideas and even launch a publication of your own.

This course counts as a Humanities and the Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Susanne Althoff is the editor of The Boston Globe Magazine; she joined in 2003 as part of an effort to relaunch the publication and bring in female readers age 18-34. While at the Globe, Susanne also launched and served as the editorial director of Lola, a free women's magazine distributed throughout Greater Boston. Susanne was also the executive editor of Natural Health, a women's health and fitness magazine. She received her Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.


EXP-0058-CS: Social Marketing
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Do we sell ideas the same way we hawk iPads? Are identical emotional strings pulling us to choose a president as to purchase an Impreza over a Prius? Are memes really the genes of our moral, social and cultural constructs? In our media saturated environment, the same tactics that create consumer lust, can also make us care about and invest in social causes, belief systems and political ideologies.

We will explore why this is so through the theories that underlie the art of mass persuasion. But we will also learn by doing by working for six local non-profit organizations. Students will form teams that will each operate as a real world marketing consultant to its non-profit "client." They will analyze their clients' communications and marketing goals and produce a customized marketing communications plan that includes both strategies and tactics such as logos, web pages, print materials, digital media, or event and outreach concepts. Each class will include analyses of websites, advertisements and various campaigns. Guest speakers from the industry will add their perspective.

This course will count as a Media Practice elective toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Gail Bambrick is Senior Marketing Communications Writer at Tufts. She uses the written word and strategic planning to focus Tufts' identity and messaging in online, print and web communications. She has also been Director of Publications and Associate Director of Communications and Public Relations for the university, as well as the News Media and Public Relations Manager for the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She earned her Ph.D. at Tufts in American literature.


EXP-0059-S: Food in Film and Performance
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

From Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton and Luis Buñuel to such Futurists as Ferran Adria, this interdisciplinary course focuses on the uses and representations of food from the birth of film to contemporary art practices.

It's fair to say that food has been extensively analyzed for its nutritional value, as a political fulcrum, and as a way to understand social organization. However, analysis of its uses as a creative medium and as an artistic subject deserves expansion.

In doing so, we will discuss how artists perform food, film food, and why the subject of food has increasingly become a topic of creative investigation. We will look at how artists create and react to representations of food, and we will use food as a lens to understand film aesthetics, performance theory, issues of gender, race, class and representation, and contemporary connections between art and activism. We will seek to understand artists' intentions and meanings through screenings and readings as well as experientially through our own creative works. As a culmination of the course, we will ourselves create and "perform food" in a final communal feast.

This course will count as a Film Criticism elective toward the Film Studies minor and as a Humanities and the Arts elective toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Elizabeth Cohen is a filmmaker, artist, and instructor at Montserrat College of Art. Elizabeth's work critically engages with food, and she began her food-based artistic endeavors by staging interactive installations on the topic of food and memory. Her work more recently turned to considerations of reenactment in film and food. Elizabeth also worked as the film producer of the award-winning experimental film The Jettisoned. Elizabeth received her M.F.A. from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.


EXP-0060-S: Haiti, the U.S., and the Politics of Disaster
Monday, 6:30-9:00pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Is Haiti simply a foreign policy failure on the part of the United States? Or have there been other more complicated forces at work? Either way, how can we ignore our neighbor?

Taught by a journalist who has worked in and on Haiti for over two decades, this course will examine Haiti, its history, its struggles, and the effects of U.S. policy at the same time as it looks at issues related to the news industry and how media can contribute to (or stifle) progressive social change.

Through analysis and discussions of readings, videos, and news coverage, students will get a glimpse at the dilemmas facing any conscientious foreigner working in a foreign land at the same time as they learn about some of the most heinous moments in Haitian and hemispheric history.

This course will count as a Social Science elective toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Jane Regan is media scholar and on-the-ground journalist with three decades of experience in the United States, Latin America, and at the BBC. Regan has also received numerous awards for her print, television news, online and documentary film work, mostly in Haiti. She currently teaches investigative journalism in Haiti and coordinates a multimedia and multi-language watchdog reporting consortium.


EXP-0063-S: Democratic Transition in Libya
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Is Libya the best hope for a lasting democracy to emerge from that unique moment in time dubbed "Arab Spring"?

This class is empirically driven and policy oriented. It is a multi-dimensional analysis of the complex reality unfolding in a country emerging from the revolution against a 42 year long brutal dictatorship.

In this course we will analyze the first steps of a three-fold endeavor: democratic transition, state building and market liberalization. This course spans across multiple disciplines to draw together the various facets of reality and get a sense of how that reality may evolve.

Jean-Louis Perroux Romanet has spent the past two years in Libya working in the field and gathering data for his research as a Ph.D. candidate at the Fletcher School. Jean-Louis has designed and managed a civil society development program funded by the National Endowment for Democracy, worked as a governance analyst as the Country Lead Researcher for Global Integrity, and has conducted analysis and research on civil society, justice, and security as a consultant for Acted, USIP, UNICEF, UNDP, and DAI-State Department.


EXP-0072-S: Illegal: Undocumented Latin@s in the United States
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Given the intensity of feeling expressed on all sides of the "immigration issue," is conflict inevitable and consensus possible?

Academe provides a forum for the development of an analytic framework to approach this divisive issue of undocumented migration, into and within the United States, and to encourage its information from proponents and opponents of immigration, rarely if ever are undocumented migrants themselves given a voice in this discussion. With historical, political, sociological, anthropological, psychological, cinematic, secondary and primary sources, students will learn about the phenomenon of undocumented immigration from the perspective of the undocumented immigrant.

Robert LeRoux Hernandez practices law in Massachusetts, primarily employment law, and he has been in positions of leadership in national, state, and local bar organizations. He received his J.D. from Harvard Law School.


EXP-0075-S: The Internet, Social Media, and the Law
Thursday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Is there such a thing as privacy on the Internet? Should there be laws prohibiting the use of information on the Internet and in social media from use by employers, colleges, and others? Should anonymity on the Internet be protected?

This course will cover such topics as whether there is defamation protection on the Internet and in the use of social media, the protection of anonymous postings, sexting, cyberbullying, and more. Students in this class will critically analyze such legal issues using selected readings, class discussions, library research, and written assignments.

This course will count as a Social Science elective toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Robert Chwaliszewski is an attorney and was employed as a corporate lawyer for over 20 years in the high-tech industry primarily as in-house counsel for the Hewlett-Packard Company and its spin-off, Agilent Technologies. During the past few years, he has advised corporations and clients of law firms on employment, contract and other legal matters. He also teaches political science, business, and criminal justice at area colleges.


EXP-0082-OS: Introduction to Sports Management (Online)
ARR
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Who's the bigger star? The All-Pro quarterback or his agent? The women's Wimbledon champ or her management company? The league MVP or the head of the players union?

This course examines and analyzes the field of Sports Management through theory and practice. Students will explore topics such as the cultural aspects of modern-day sports, the current U.S. sports industry, the globalization of sports, ethics in sports, and legal aspects within the sports industry.

Additionally, this class will introduce students to the management side of sports through the study of marketing and promotions, sales and public relations, and the economics and finance of sports.

Please Note: This course is being taught online using Trunk, e-mail, PowerPoint and collaborative web based tools.

Jason Becker is a member of the faculty in the Department of Sports Management at SUNY Fredonia. He has taught widely in this field and has created a degree program for undergraduates. He holds a Master's degree in Sport Administration from Canisius College and has also been teaching online extensively over the last few years.


EXP-0087-S: Microfinance
Monday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

What if you could give $25 to a business owner in an underdeveloped nation and the impact would be that they could feed, educate, and clothe their children for the next 10 months? Would you believe this is possible?

In the world of microfinance anything is possible and extraordinary results can be achieved.

In this course, we'll address how these achievements can be made and we'll take a comprehensive look at microfinance and its impact on people and societies. After forming a solid understanding of the various products offered under the microfinance umbrella (i.e., microcredit, microsavings, microinsurance), we'll collaborate to examine opportunities for domestic and international microfinance initiatives. Students will actively participate in the microfinance market by lending to an actual business owner of their choice, analyzing real-time case studies from around the globe and interacting with Boston-area microloan recipients.

This course is supported by the Experimental College's Distler Family Endowment, the aim of which is to provide students with courses that bridge the academy and the world of work.

Adam Grenier is a former Fellow with Kiva.org, a leading online microfinance lending community whose mission is to connect people through lending for the sake of alleviating poverty. As a Kiva Fellow, Adam worked with Salone Microfinance Trust (SMT) in Sierra Leone, a non-governmental organization that serves the financial needs of over 6,000 microfinance clients. In 2011, Adam traveled to Colombia to document the impact of microfinance in underdeveloped areas of Barranquilla and Cartagena. Most recently, Adam traveled to Mongolia on behalf of Kiva to research and author a case study on loans distributed to offset air pollution in the capitol city of Ulaanbaatar. He has successfully taught this course a number of times in the Experimental College.


EXP-0090-S: Teaching a Seminar
ARR
2.0 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

This course is designed for undergraduates who are teaching courses this semester in the Experimental College.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0090-TS: Teaching Assistant Workshop
ARR
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading

This course is designed for undergraduates who are teaching assistants for courses in the Experimental College.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0091-S: EPIIC: The Middle East and North Africa
Tuesday and Thursday, 3:00-5:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This course will provide a comprehensive, critical look at an extensive and volatile region, extending from Morocco to Iran, from Algiers to Sana'a. We will consider the implications of the fact that, while home to about 380 million people or about 6% of the world's population, MENA possesses 60% of the world's oil reserves and 45% of the world's natural gas reserves.

Special attention will be paid to the demographics of MENA, a highly diverse arena of intense geopolitical rivalry, one marked by inequality of resources and income where approximately 23 percent of its population lives on less than $2 a day, nearly one-fifth is between the ages of 15 and 24, and the unemployment rate of 25% far exceeds that of any other region in the world.

With these contexts in mind, we will attempt to understand the socio-economic and political challenges now facing the region including its strategic importance to Israel and the United States; the 2011 civil uprisings that originated in North Africa; the impact of information and communication technology on these actions; the demise of sclerotic authoritarian despots and their regimes; challenged elections; brutal, anarchic militia rule, political duress and severe repression; increasing threats to human and civil rights; and the highly uncertain and vulnerable status of women.

In pursuing our inquiry, we will engage experts from such organizations as the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the International Crisis Group, the United States Institute for Peace, the Hague Institute for Global Justice, the Palestine Research Center, and the Jerusalem Center for International Affairs.

Please Note: This course is a continuation of the EPIIC class from last semester.

Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts, and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds an M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.


EXP-0091-AS: Inquiry Teaching Group
ARR
0.5 credits, Letter Grading

Inquiry is a global-issues simulation for high school students, and forms an integral part of the year's activities for EPIIC. Students in this course will help design and enact a simulation on the Middle East and North Africa, to be held during the Spring 2014 semester. In the process, students will mentor a high school delegation and prepare them for this simulation — helping them understand all the materials and issues involved.

Heather Barry is the Associate Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.


EXP-0096-S: Auditing for Breadth
ARR
0.5-1.0 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years as an undergraduate. (One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits.) Please note: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0097-AS: QUIDNUNC: Topics in Sustainable Development – Food and Water
Monday, 7:30-9:00pm
0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

This group independent study – or "Quidnunc" – will provide members of BUILD: Nicaragua the opportunity and tools to begin and deepen their exploration of topics relating to sustainable development. We will use the essential resources of water and food as a vehicle to launch our study of topics within the categories of health, agriculture, and the environment.

Students will be challenged to ask questions about the economic, political, environmental, gender, and health implications of each topic, as well as the roles of various actors, including the students themselves. The course will include a mix of student-led presentations, guest lectures, and interactive activities such as discussions and debates.

For more information, contact Paige Tweedy (paige.tweedy@tufts.edu).


EXP-0097-BS: QUIDNUNC: Generation Citizen
Monday, 7:30-9:00pm
0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

This group independent study – or "Quidnunc" – is designed to teach the principles of democratic education through the lens of civic engagement. Participants will not only learn, they will also teach. Each student, or Democracy Coach (DC), will be responsible for teaching the Generation Citizen (GC) curriculum to one or more Middle School or High School classrooms over the course of the semester. DCs will concurrently use the theories and practices taught in this course to benefit their classes.

The objective of this course is to help Democracy Coaches bridge the gap between theory and action, as well as to allow students to grow as educators. Readings will aim to give pedagogical perspective and each class will also consist of group troubleshooting and classroom planning.

For more information, contact Ben Berman (Benjamin.berman@tufts.edu).


EXP-0099-CS: CMS Internship
ARR
1.0 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

Supervised internship in communications and mass media. Student can intern at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet approved by instructor. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hours a week), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. Registration by consent of instructor. Student should consult with instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For more information, contact the instructor, Leslie Goldberg at leslie.goldberg@tufts.edu.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Leslie Goldberg (J '84) is the founder of Blue Sun Communications, a corporate communications consulting firm. She holds a M.S. in Mass Communication from Boston University.


EXP-0101-CS: Advanced Filmmaking
ARR
0.5-1.0 credits, Letter Grading

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who have completed EXP-0056-CS: Making Movies – or who are able to demonstrate equivalent competence – can continue their training as filmmakers. Students who initially qualify will present a business plan for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to TuftsFilmWorks' production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. In return, they agree to watch a negotiated number of source films, keep a Producer's Log, and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through to produce their film and their reaction to the film once it is done.

This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor and for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

Advanced Filmmaking is supported by the generosity of Lisa and Bruce Cohen (J'86 and A'83, respectively).

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0102-CS: Advanced Electronic and Digital Media
ARR
0.5-1.0 credits, Letter Grading

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor and for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0192-S: Independent Study
ARR
Either 0.5 or 1.0 credits, Letter or Pass/Fail Grading

By arrangement only.

Topics must fall within the range of courses taught by the Experimental College. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call 617-627-3384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0194-CS: CMS Senior Project
ARR
0.5-1.0 credits, Letter Grading

For CMS Minors only. All CMS minors completing their Senior Projects this semester must register for this class.

Julie Dobrow is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.


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