Courses: Current Courses

Fall 2015 Courses

This page was last updated on 06/18/2015.

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EXP-0003-F Storytelling: Narrative and the Oral Tradition
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00PM

Just as the slam scene infused life into poetry, such new forms as the widely heard Moth Radio Hour, the proliferation of podcasts, and the emergence of story slams have moved the timeless art of storytelling from a cultural backwater into the strong currents of the 21st century.

This course will engage students in various genres of the art of storytelling. We will examine and learn to tell stories while exploring our memory's life experience for material. Short reading on the neurology and social significance of oral narrative support our understanding of our innate human trait. We will focus on the skills, process, and practice of oral story. Students will learn to create and tell their own personal stories as well as their original versions of a fable, tall tales, myths or legends as they engage in the living art of storytelling. This course offers an enjoyable way to improve public speaking skills, learn powerful prewriting strategies, and begin to practice the art of live performance.

This course has been approved by the Academic Review Board to count toward Arts distribution credit.

Norah Dooley (A '76) is a master teacher and children's author. Norah has been a featured storyteller at conferences, festivals, elementary schools, and libraries throughout the country. She is the co-founder of massmouth.org and the Greater Boston story slam series, now in its fourth year. Her Stories Live curriculum developed from her 20 years as a performing artist and educator has been embraced by a dozen high schools in the past 3 years. Norah has successfully adapted her engaging, interactive lessons for business, therapeutic uses, and entertainment purposes for storytellers of all ages.

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EXP-0005-F An Introduction to Translation: Practice and Theory
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM

Are you fluent in a language other than English? Have you ever thought about what it takes to translate a text from, say, French, or Arabic, or Japanese into English? Would you like to learn how it's done? In this course students will complete three projects: a non-fiction translation, a literary translation, and the subtitling of a video. At the same time, they will read thought-provoking and engaging writing on the subject, including classic texts, current controversies, and questions of translation and power, human rights, and war. The course will be conducted in English, and students may work from any language into English.

NOTE: You should have completed at least Level 4 in your language of choice (or have equivalent experience). Upper level courses and study abroad are a plus.

Ellen Elias-Bursac has been translating Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian writing into English for thirty -five years and has received two national awards. She worked as a language reviser at the War Crimes Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia in The Hague for six years and taught at the Harvard University Slavic Department for ten years. She holds an MA and PhD from Zagreb University in Comparative Literature/Philology.

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EXP-0006-F Social Justice Through Young Adult Fiction
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Thursday, 6:30-9:00PM

What social justice lessons do we learn from Katniss, Harry, Meg, and Tris? Why is some of our most cherished social justice fiction written for adolescents? Why do these stories captivate us in the ways that they do?

This is a course about the intersections in social justice education and Young Adult (YA) fiction. Students will be introduced (or re-introduced) to the genre through reading notable and culturally relevant YA texts through a social justice lens. Students will apply critical race theory, feminist theory, literary theory, and theories of social justice to the texts and will examine the pedagogical strategies of teaching social justice through YA fiction. This course invites students to examine the pedagogy of social justice while creating opportunities to think, read, and write critically about YA fiction.

Jessamine Beal has worked as an activist and educator on queer identities, social justice, and diversity for the past decade. She recently joined the Office of Diversity Services as the Assistant Director at Suffolk University. Jessamine holds a Master's degree in gender studies from Brandeis University with a focus on intersectionality, critical race theory, feminism, pop culture, and queer theory.

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EXP-0007-F Writing Fellowship Seminar
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30PM

In this course, new Writing Fellows explore theoretical frameworks and practice foundational skills as they learn how to become good peer tutors and develop their own tutoring philosophies. The class is held during rather than before the first semester of tutoring in order to reinforce the importance of self-reflection as a necessary part of any teaching practice. The course also emphasizes the "fellowship" that is an essential and unique aspect of the Tufts Writing Fellows program by creating a community of writers and developing educators: peers supporting peers as writers and novice writing tutors.

This course is open to only students who have already been accepted into the Writing Fellows Program.

Kristina Aikens is Associate Director of the Academic Resource Center at Tufts. She holds a PhD in English from Tufts and has tutored and taught writing since 2001.

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EXP-0012-F Argentine Tango: Culture, Music, and the Dance
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Monday, 6:30-9:30PM

This course is an introduction to, and immersion in, the culture and history, music, and dance of one of Latin America's richest art forms, tango argentine.

We will combine academic work with studio training and offer an interdisciplinary and comparative study of both theory and practice.

Throughout the semester, we will analyze tango music, films, and literature from the early twentieth century to the present day. In addition, weekly dance lessons will provide a progressive introduction to tango salon. Students will learn the dance by studying it and by doing it, as they engage regularly in critical and creative work drawing on both mind and body.

Beginners are welcome; no previous dance experience or musical training required.

NOTE: Course materials from Argentina can be accessed for those with reading knowledge of Spanish. However, knowledge of Spanish is not required: all materials will be available in English or in English-language translation. All films in Spanish are subtitled in English.

Thomas Wisniewski is the current and founding president of the Harvard Argentine Tango Society and the saxophone chair of the New England Philharmonic. He is an advanced PhD Candidate in Comparative Literature at Harvard University.

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EXP-0013-F Improv: Applications Beyond the Stage
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30PM

In recent commencement speeches, figures like Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, and Stephen Colbert advocate for the broader implications of values they have learned as improv comedians.

This class promises to engage students with improvisation in two distinct, yet complimentary ways. First, through assigned material written by cognitive-scientists, business specialists, and theatre experts, this class will foster conversation regarding the practical application of improv games in the work place. Second, the class will give students hands on experience with improv games to help them become more confident, stronger collaborators, and excited risk­takers.

Matthew McMahan worked for over ten years as an actor, dramaturg, and improv comedian in Boston, Dallas, and New York. Currently, he's a fourth-year PhD Candidate in Drama at Tufts University, where he has taught two semesters of Introduction to Acting to non-majors, and where he works as a public speaking consultant for the Tufts Academic Resource Center.

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EXP-0014-F Circus and Society
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30PM

What do you think of when you think of the circus? Elephants and tigers? Aerialists dressed in sparkling costumes? An exhibition of freaks?

This course is an exploration of the Western Circus as a performance form that has the power to construct, affirm, and even change cultural values and norms. Beginning with a foundation in Western circus history, we will look at circus acts from the eighteenth century to the modem day as spectacles that have to power to resist the status quo. Considerations of gender, race, sexuality, and nationality, will guide readings, viewings, and discussions of freak shows, animal acts, aerial and acrobatic performance in theatre, film, popular culture, and on the national stage. Through the lens of the circus, this course seeks to explore the larger impact of popular, performing arts on society.

Amy Meyer has performed professionally in Boston with numerous small companies and is an artistic associate with the physical theatre troupe, Imaginary Beasts. Amy is also an aspiring acrobat, and for the past five years has been training in various circus arts, including aerial silks, static trapeze, flying trapeze, and partner acrobatics. She is currently a PhD Candidate in Drama at Tufts University and has presented work for the American Society for Theatre Research, the American Theatre and Drama Society, the Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies, and the Mid-America Theatre Conference.

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EXP-0018-F Personal Career Development
0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading
Wednesday, 4:30-6:00PM

Based on an examination of several major career development theories, student will apply key concepts to their own career development process, focusing on thoughtful self-reflection, major and career exploration, and the value of internships as a tool in the exploration and decision-making process. Through reading assignments, analysis, and writing, students will discover more about themselves and the world of work. This course is ideally suited to sophomores who are beginning the career planning and decision-making process.

Donna Esposito is the Senior Associate Director of the Tufts Career Center, overseeing all career counseling and programming for undergraduate and graduate students in the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering. With more than 25 years of experience in career development, she has worked for Tufts for 18 years and previously held positions at Harvard and Stonehill Colleges. She has a Master of Arts in Counseling Psychology, with a specialization in College Student Personnel Services/College Student Development from the University of California at Santa Barbara.

Nicole Anderson is the Assistant Director of the Tufts Career Center, specializing in programming for first years, sophomores, and international students, as well as provides career advising across all class years, majors, and degrees. She is a highly skilled career advisor, teacher, and student development professional with more than 20 years of experience in higher education. Nicole has worked at Tufts for the past 14 years, and at Boston College prior to that. She has a Master of Arts in Higher Education Administration from Boston College.

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EXP-0020-F Pharmacology and Therapeutics
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30PM

Can you image getting a headache without being able to take a pain reliever? Or suffering from depression, breast cancer, pneumonia, or diabetes without medication?

Drugs are often the most effective way to treat disease and alleviate distress. This course introduces students to the study of the use of drugs in the prevention and treatment of disease. We will apply the principles of problem-based learning to real and contrived patient scenarios to explore the relationships between physiology and pharmacology. The course is well suited for students who aspire to pursue a career in the medical sciences.

Frank Massaro is an Assistant Director of Pharmacy at Tufts Medical Center where he manages clinical programs for the Department of Pharmacy and is responsible for the professional development of the pharmacist staff. He also serves on the faculty at Tufts University School of Medicine and at Northeastern University's Bouvé College of Health Sciences. He received his PhD in Pharmacy from Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science in 1985.

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EXP-0023-F Human Development in the Digital Age
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Thursday, 6:30-9:00PM

Networked technologies are changing the way we play, learn, and grow. In this course we will focus on the experiences that new technologies and digital media provide children and adolescents and how these experiences might influence development. We will draw on theories of development as a conceptual framework for understanding how computing technologies interact with the life of a child and how children actively use technologies to meet their own goals. Our course is organized around the life of the child (infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence) and we will play with (and design our own!) technologies and media for each stage of development. We will critically evaluate commercially available forms of technology, apps, and games for children and discuss trends in the rising educational technology movement. Students will experience educational technology in museum and lab settings, meet with tech industry professionals, psychologists, and teachers, and enjoy the "hard fun" of playing and learning with technology.

This is an interdisciplinary course and we welcome students from all majors and background with a curiosity about EdTech and child development.

Amanda Strawhacker (G '13) currently works with the DevTech Research Group where she has collaborated and coordinated for various National Science Foundation-funded projects. She is a research analyst focusing on designing, implementing, and evaluating developmentally appropriate technology for young children. Amanda earned her MA in Child Development at Tufts University, concentrating in Children and New Technologies.

Amanda Sullivan (G '12) is a researcher examining the role of new technologies in the lives of children. She has been a Graduate Research Assistant with the DevTech Research Group for the past three years where she has collaborated on multiple National Science Foundation-funded projects related to EdTech. Amanda also holds an MA in Child Development and is pursuing her PhD in Child Development at Tufts University.

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EXP-0024-F Creation, Fabrication, and Problem Solving
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30PM

Have you ever had an idea but didn't have the resources or knowledge to bring it into reality? Do you want the self-confidence and skills to address everyday problems with technical solutions instead of just having to accept how things are?

Similar to the Maker movement, this course will embrace creation, fabrication and problem solving. Using a project-based approach, students will engage in studying the maker movement and immerse them in the experience of making and designing. Using tools such as 3D printers, laser cutters, woodworking tools, ceramics, or needle and thread in the makerspaces of Tufts campus, you will develop solutions and manufacture prototypes while improving and honing the critical thinking and problem solving skills that help in both personal and professional life. Take this opportunity to work in interdisciplinary teams, exercise creativity in new challenges, invent new creations, try new technologies, and use some old ones in interesting ways.

Brian O'Connell owns and operates PaperBots®, a product line dedicated to enabling K-12 students to create paper and craft material engineering projects. Prior to returning to grad school, O'Connell worked as a Mechanical Engineer and Project Lead at Kollmorgen Electro-Optical designing periscopes and optical masts for submarines. He is currently a PhD student at Tufts University, a research assistant at the Center for Engineering Education and Outreach, and manager of Jumbo's Maker Studio.

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EXP-0027-F Human/Animal Studies
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00PM

How do humans and animals interact? How do we define and identify the ranges of complex human and animal relationships?

In this class we will examine the consistent presence and use of animals by humans throughout history, the advantages and disadvantages that these connections provide for both humans and animals, and many of the ethical dilemmas surrounding these dynamics. A survey of these connections throughout history, literature, entertainment, medicine, and religion reveals that humans and animals have been interacting with each other for thousands of years. We hunt them, eat them, wear them, conduct tests on them, idolize them, work them, and study them. Some species appear as lovable characters in books, team mascots, cultural idols, and as children's toys while others we fear and even demonize. Included on the animal-human relationship spectrum is the presence of domesticated animals in our homes. Cats, dogs, and other species have joined our human families and are cared for with the same love and financial support that many people provide for their children.

This course has been approved by the Academic Review Board to count toward Natural Sciences distribution credit.

Laura Cummings (A '00 and DVM '05) is an emergency veterinarian in a twenty-four hour critical care hospital. Laura has been intrigued with the ethical issues in veterinary medicine and surrounding topics for over a decade, and she has researched the topic thoroughly. Laura has worked in a zoo, a primate research facility, a kill-shelter, and a wildlife refuge to make an effort to understand the ethical controversies in these widely diverse environments.

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EXP-0030-F Neuroscience and Criminal Justice
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Monday, 6:30-9:00PM

What did the "eyewitness" really see? Is the defendant lying? Was he/she legally insane? Will he/she pose a danger to the community if released?

Every day, in courtrooms across the country, lawyers, judges, and juries confront these important questions. Exciting new developments in neuroscience and cognitive psychology offer the tantalizing possibility of scientifically-based answers. But they also create a risk of misleading juries and judges.

This course is a cross-disciplinary inquiry into the intersection of neuroscience and the criminal justice system. For each topic, we'll cover core concepts in molecular and cognitive neuroscience. We'll use that knowledge to inform our interpretation of relevant case law. Through this unique perspective, we will look at the uses and abuses of neuroscience in the courtroom and debate the complex policy choices that courts and legislatures will have to make in the years ahead.

Megan Krench is a researcher using drosophila (fruit flies); she conducts molecular genetic research into a fatal neurodegenerative disorder called Huntington's disease. She is a PhD candidate in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Joel Fleming is an associate at Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr. His practice primarily involves securities litigation on behalf of public companies and life insurers. He holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

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EXP-0033-F Tufts Community Emergency Response Team
0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading
Tuesdays, 4:30-5:45

The T-CERT course provides students with the skills required by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to serve as a Community Emergency Response Team member within their campus community. Completion of this training will provide the student with the basic skills they may need in the aftermath of a disaster or other emergency and the opportunity to assist the Tufts Community and the Department of Public Safety by joining T-CERT. By working together, T-CERT members can assist in saving lives and protecting property using the skills gained in this course. This course meets FEMA and Emergency Management Institute (EMI) requirements for CERT training.

Matthew Hart is a Continuity Planning Specialist in the Department of Public & Environmental Safety. In this role he assists departments across the university in developing their own plans to cope with emergencies and disasters. He received a B.S. in emergency management from Massachusetts Maritime Academy and has earned the Associate Emergency Manager credential through the International Association of Emergency Managers.

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EXP-0035-AF Rape Aggression Defense
Monday, 4:30-6:30pm
0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self-defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the person who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile.

This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Christopher Fielding and Omar McGovern are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.

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EXP-0035-BF Weisse/Robertson. Rape Aggression Defense
Thursday, 4:30-6:30pm
0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self-defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the person who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile.

This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Darren Weisse and Matthew Robertson are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.

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EXP-0042-F The Social Psychological Dimensions of White Supremacy
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30PM

Why are Tyrone and Keisha more likely to get shot by a police officer than Tyler and Kate? Why do Black children have a preference for White dolls over Black ones?

This seminar is designed to provide an overview and understanding of the far reaching psychological effects of White Supremacy (i.e., power structure/ideology) on the individual, especially as it pertains to anti­Blackness in the context of the United States. The course will draw upon the rich psychological literature to explore how White Supremacy influences the psychological processes of groups who hold power and status, as well as how White Supremacy can shape the psychology and behavior of marginalized low status groups (i.e., Black individuals). This course adopts a scientific perspective and examines the issues of White Supremacy in relation to the theory and practice of social science generally, and social psychology in particular. In addition to scholarly articles, newspaper articles, short documentaries, and pop culture references will also be used to help illustrate the ways in which White Supremacy influences daily life.

Simon Howard is a National Science Foundation Graduate Student Research Fellow, a Gerald Gill Fellow for the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy at Tufts University and a Non-Residential Fellow at Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University. In May 2014 he was nominated for a Special Mention for Outstanding Graduate Student Contribution to Undergraduate Education award. He is currently a PhD Candidate in Social Psychology at Tufts University.

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EXP-0044-F Biased Bodies: The Exclusion of "the Female" in Science and Research
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Monday, 6:30-9:00PM

How are women perceived, included, and excluded in science?

This course seeks to explore these issues, introducing ideas about how science is -- and has been -- conducted in the United States, as viewed through both conventional and feminist microscopes. Of note, we will examine the implications of the 2014 NIH policy informing the research community at large that the inclusion of female animals in publicly funded biomedical research would become mandatory. We will consider, in depth, how this sweeping statement underscores a side of science many do not see, that our model systems are inherently biased, that societal and cultural biases are systematically introduced, and that they manifest at all levels of the scientific enterprise.

Laura Darnieder is heavily involved in science teaching in the greater Boston area, working closely with many area college students as they undertake Organic Chemistry I and II, helping as a lab instructor in a joint Pathways to PhD program with UMass Boston and Tufts University, and also assisting local IB Biology students at Josiah Quincy Upper School. She is currently a third year graduate student in the Neuroscience Department of the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts.

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EXP-0046-F Philanthropy, Nonprofits, and Community
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30PM

Want to be an agent for community change? Wish you had money to give away to your favorite organization?

Philanthropy plays many roles in our communities, from alleviating crisis situations to encouraging strategic, systemic change. Nonprofit organizations are the intermediaries connecting donors to community needs. Students have the opportunity to practice philanthropy by serving as a young adult grant-making board to award $25,000 to local nonprofits in the cities of Medford, Somerville, Cambridge, and Boston.

Students will learn about different styles of philanthropy and effective nonprofit management; how to think about and evaluate impact as a philanthropist; how to run a community project; how to read nonprofit financials and assess nonprofit organizational health and potential; sources of philanthropic news, and thinking; and trends in philanthropy and nonprofit management. Students will design their own process for requesting grant proposals and evaluating applications. The process of selecting grant recipients will bring students very close to the local community. A number of community philanthropists and nonprofit leaders will join our class discussions, offering the opportunity to learn directly from those in the field.

This course is supported by a generous gift from Alice and Nathan Gantcher.

Nancy Lippe is the Associate Director of Civic Schools, a local Boston effort to reconnect schools with their civic mission, and she has led youth programs in schools and communities for the last fifteen years. Prior to moving to Boston, she worked as a program officer for a small community foundation in the San Francisco Bay Area, promoting youth programs, local philanthropy and connecting donors with local programs. Her work has involved being both a grant seeker and a grant maker, resulting in a great appreciation for the opportunities and challenges of both sides. She holds a doctorate in education from the Fielding Graduate University. She has taught this course previously in the Experimental College.

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EXP-0048-F The Refugee Journey
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Monday, 6:30-9:00PM

Why would someone leave their homeland, and what are their real prospects for starting over in a new location? Each year the United States welcomes nearly 70,000 refugees for resettlement across the country. Why do these people seek refuge, and how do they build new lives upon arrival?

This course traces the stages of a refugee's journey, from conflict in a troubled nation, to their decision to flee, and from travel to seek asylum in a neighboring country, to eventual resettlement overseas. It explores these from various perspectives, from the nation-state down to the individual. The students will become familiar with key theories and decision-making about forced migration, as well as the policies and reality of integration. They will also discover more about the experience of resettled refugees through direct contact in the classroom and local communities. Ultimately, the course connects the humanitarian crises that spark displacement overseas with resettlement taking place in our own backyard.

David Sussman has served in the U.S. government's International Emergency and Refugee Health Branch, worked for the International Organization and UNHCR, and resettled refugees in Boston with the International Rescue Committee (IRC). He is currently a doctoral candidate at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.

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EXP-0049-F Days of Rage: The Weather Underground and American Terrorism
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30PM

Since September 11, 2011, the War on Terror has been at the center of public policy discourse. Although the actors are new, the theme is not. Terrorism, usually linked to political fringes, has often emerged as a political hot potato.

Almost 45 years ago, at the height of the Cold War, the focus was not religious fundamentalists abroad but domestic young left-wing radicals who named themselves from a Bob Dylan lyric. Although popularly classified as political extremists, those who founded the Weathermen and the Weather Underground sprang from the heart of "Baby Boom" culture and were in many respects the polar opposite of the religious fundamentalists now at center-stage. Is there anything we can learn from them about the "terrorism" of today?

This course will examine the Weather Underground from an interdisciplinary perspective, drawing upon history, sociology, politics, psychology, and cinema to seek to understand how a group of white middle class American college students evolved into a "terrorist" organization and thereafter reintegrated into "mainstream" culture. This examination will search for answers to questions such as, "what is 'terrorism'? Does it include all forms of political violence? Is political violence ever ethical? How do intellectuals rationalize political violence or terrorism? What is the role of ideology? Psychology?

Robert Hernandez currently works as a lawyer at his own private practice, concentrating in civil rights and employment discrimination. He has also taught as adjunct faculty at Tufts Experimental College, the College of the Holy Cross, and Boston University School of Law.

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EXP-0050-CF Social Media: Participatory Culture and Content Creation
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30pm
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

In this course students will collaborate to explore and analyze the most disruptive change in how we communicate since the advent of the telegraph: social media (including blogs, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, YikYak, Whisper and many more.) We will dive into the business models social media platforms, look at how brands succeed or fail on social media, debate the merits of anonymous posting, and question if social media really can save the world from tyranny.

Students will gain a deeper understanding of how social media platforms impact our relationships to political and social institutions (the media, government, academia), to each other (friendships, family and romance) and to ourselves (our IRL and digital identities). Students will actively use social media during the course, publishing essays on Medium and interacting with classmates' work.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Jesse Littlewood is a digital strategist with Echo & Company, a Somerville-based firm that consults with non-profits, government agencies and socially responsible businesses. Echo helps these groups effectively use online technology to meet their goals by drawing on digital advertising, engagement marketing, online membership building, fundraising and social media dynamics.

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EXP-0051-F Narrative and Documentary Practice
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Wednesday, 4:30-7:00PM; Friday, 9:30AM-12:00PM, 550 Boston Ave

As we venture into an era where digitally delivered media and 24-hour news cycles bombard us with a deluge of facts, minutiae, perspective, and hyperbole, the role of narrative storytelling is increasingly useful as a means to present information that is immersive, substantive and accessible. Narrative storytelling elaborates beyond the reporting of facts; it can take something specific – an experience, a voice, a place – and use it to illuminate a larger societal issue.

This course serves as a foundation for preparing students, first, to seek out and understand important global, national and local issues and, then, to explain them in a compelling way using visual, written, and oral narrative techniques. It will equip students with a broad practical and theoretical understanding of how to tell stories about the world in which we live – doing so through a variety of immersive exercises, technical workshops, class discussions, guest lectures, and group and individual critiques.

NOTE: This course is High Demand. You must attend the first class meeting to be considered for enrollment.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Samuel James (A '10) is the Program Coordinator for the Program for Narrative and Documentary Practice, housed in the Tufts University Institute for Global Leadership. He is the 2014 recipient of the International Center of Photography's Infinity Award for Young Photographer of the Year.

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EXP-0052-CF PR and Marketing: Unraveling the Spin
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30

What is the formula for mind control? Take a little psychology, a pinch of sociology, a smidge of anthropology, some cognitive analysis, and add a healthy dash of strategic media manipulation. Give a good stir. It's all the ingredients you need to decide a Presidential election, repair the reputation of BP after the Gulf oil spill, make more people buy Hondas than Kias, or choose Coke over Pepsi.

Primarily using case studies, this course will look at the history of public relations and marketing in the US and how it evolved in parallel with our media environment. We will explore how the mechanics of this global mega-industry create strategies that influence complex world affairs or simply the toothpaste we use.

Guest speakers from the industry will share their thoughts. Students will work in teams on a final project to solve a PR/marketing challenge by creating their own ads, messages, and strategic plan.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Gail Bambrick is Senior Marketing Communications Writer at Tufts. She uses the written word and strategic planning to focus Tufts' identity and messaging in online, print, and web communications. She has also been Director of Publications and Associate Director of Communications and Public Relations for the university as well as the News Media and Public Relations Manager for the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She holds a PhD from Tufts University in American Literature.

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EXP-0053-F Documentary: History, Theory, and New Directions
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00PM

Documentaries, at their best, enhance our understanding of the world beyond ourselves.

This course will look at how documentarians have approached themes commonly explored within the genre. By looking at still and moving images, students will gain an understanding of how advancements in technology, the arts, and culture have come together to tell the stories of our world. We will focus on how each documentarian has found a distinct point of view. By looking at the work of photographers, filmmakers, and media artists, students will accomplish three things: (1)gain an understanding of documentary history, (2) grasp the theories at work behind documentary practice, and (3) find inspiration for their own work.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Humanities Elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an Elective.

Natalie Minik was the 2013-2014 Lewis Hine Fellow at the Center for Documentary Studies where she made work centered on documentary's relationship to Boston area non-profits. She received her MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts at Duke University, where she also taught photography courses. Additionally, she is cofounder of the online photography publication, OneOneThousand.org.

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EXP-0054-CF Movie Stars and Stardom: A Cultural History
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Friday, 10:00AM-1:00PM Ever since Florence Lawrence became the first film actor to be billed by name in 1910, the movie star has been the common coin of American and global entertainment culture. We go to movies to see the people in them, a complex, century-long love affair made up of equal parts affection, emulation, obsession, consumption, and envy.

This class will consider movie stars and film stardom from the silent era to the 21st century, establishing key personality and social types, tracing the rise and fall of the cinematic celebrity, and discussing the move from movie screen to TV screen to computer screen as stardom – or the social construct we call by that name – comes within the grasp of the audience. Through lectures, discussions, readings, and film clips, students will attain a critical understanding of celebrity discourse deeper than the standard pop culture hierarchy laid out by magazines, websites, cable TV and the gossip blogosphere. The course will take the form of a historical survey, starting at the dawn of cinema and working its way forward into the silent era, when many of the archetypes were first coined; through the studio star-factory of the 1930s and 40s; the arrival of Marlon Brando, TV, rock and roll, and youth culture in the 1950s and 1960s; the glamour revival of the 1980s and 1990s; and the 21st-century breakdown of the star machine under the pressures of new platforms and technologies.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Humanities Elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an Elective.

Ty Burr is a film critic for The Boston Globe and the author of Gods Like Us: On Movie Stardom and Modern Fame.

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EXP-0055-CF/FMS-0022 Media Literacy
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Monday, 1:30-4:00PM

What does it mean to be "media literate" and how has this changed as a consequence of the introduction of new communication technologies? Do media truly democratize, and what relationship exists between participatory culture and participatory democracy? Exploration of the theorists working in the field of New Media Literacy and examination of how the systems and institutions of mass media shape images; analysis and critique of the literature on media effects. Focus on utilizing media production as an application of course concepts. Assessment of core debates surrounding the value of bringing new media technologies and participatory culture practices into formal systems of education and discussion of why American public education has been so reluctant to embrace them.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Social Sciences Elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an Elective. This course may be used in lieu of Soc. 40 as the core course for the CMS MCMS Minor, and it is a core course for the new FMS Major and Minor.

Julie Dobrow is Co-Director of the Film and Media Studies Program and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Child Study and Human Development.

Danielle Stacey is a PhD candidate in the Eliot Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development.

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EXP-0057-F War Stories: Grunt Lit, Hollywood, and the Making of the U.S. Military
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30PM

G.l.s and grunts. "Lone survivors" and "lionesses." Vets and victims. Who are they? What are their stories? Where and how do we encounter their voices and what can we make of them?

In this interdisciplinary course, situated at the intersections of anthropology, literature and critical media studies, we will seek to understand how the U.S. military, generally, and the American soldier, specifically, are constructed in and through a variety of genres. We'll read first-hand narratives alongside the journalistic accounts, documentaries, feature films, ethnographies and short theoretical pieces that, together, constitute the field of knowledge of the contemporary military. Highlighting questions of genre, authority, representation and power, we'll consider how both veterans and non-veterans frame and lay claim to a particular kind of military experience. We'll trace the alternative or even disruptive knowledge about American militarism offered by these "war stories," while remaining attentive to how they may also reproduce the ideologies they seek to challenge.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Social Sciences Elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an Elective.

Bethany Anne Kibler was a member of the United States Army and served in Iraq where she completed a variety of assignments dealing with counterintelligence. She is currently a fourth-year doctoral student in the joint Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies program at Harvard University.

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EXP-0059-F On the Record: Communicating for the Government
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Thursday, 6:00-8:30

"What the President really meant by those remarks..."

This course will explore the making of public policy through government press and communications operations and the dissemination of an administration's message. We will also examine the history behind official briefings and the mechanics of government press operations in an ever-changing media environment that now includes citizen journalists and social media.

In addition, students will learn how to prepare for a briefing, handle crisis communications, and deliver technical information in a compelling way. Students will also learn about serving clients and constituencies and how to balance competing interests. Finally, students will learn best practices and lessons learned in public communication. Students will be required to write communications strategy plans and prepare an overall memorandum for an incoming administration.

This course counts as a Humanities elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Nanda Chitre (J '85) has served in the Clinton and Obama Administrations as an on-the-record spokesperson. She was Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Press Secretary to President Clinton. Nanda has also worked on the NBC series The West Wing. Most recently, Nanda served as Acting Director for Public Affairs at the U.S. Department of Justice and as a Senior Advisor at the U.S. State Department.

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EXP-0060-F O Pais Tropical: Brazilian Politics and Culture
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30PM

How do you build an inclusive government and economy?

We will analyze this question with a comprehensive look at Brazilian politics and culture. First, we will study Brazilian history focusing on the critical junctures that shaped the nation and subsequent political development. Students will be familiar with the general characteristics of the pre­ Colombian period, Portuguese colonialism, the Brazilian Empire, the Republics, the military dictatorship, and the subsequent return to democracy. We will also study the long lasting impact of slavery. In the second section, we will examine substantive issues confronting the political system, applying prominent theories and ideas from the comparative politics literature to our Brazilian case. We will look at democratization, political institutions, political parties, elections, issues of political economy and development, social movements, environmental policy, and foreign relations.

Grant Burrier is an Assistant Professor of Politics & History at Curry College. He holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of New Mexico and has written and published widely on Brazil.

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EXP-0062-F Iraq: Firsthand Perspectives of A State in Flux
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30PM

How can Iraq's current security and political challenges be better understood and addressed in light of its past hundred-year history? What are some of the critical junctures in Iraq's modern history that helped shape its present political and social landscapes?

This course aims to help students with interest in security, diplomacy and international relations gain a unique insight and a deeper understanding of the political and social evolution of Iraq. We will look at how the war in Iraq has dominated much of the discourse in the international political arena over the past twelve years ever since the United States led a coalition that toppled the despotic regime of Saddam Hussain. Consideration will be paid to how the war unleashed a complex set of social and political dynamics that a totalitarian regime had managed to keep in check.

Our inquiry will begin with an examination of Iraq's history since Sykes-Picot Agreement in 1916 that divided the spoils of the Ottoman Empire's Eastern Arabia post WW-11 among the European victors and zero in on specific historic junctures and events that fashioned the nature of the Iraqi state as we see it today. We will then focus on the challenges associated with post-2003 Iraq's transition to a federal democratic state through discussing successes and failures of key constitutional and institutional processes as well as the regional implications of Iraq's transformation.

Shahla Al Kli is from the Kurdistan region of Iraq and has worked in government positions as a senior advisor for the Speaker of Kurdistan Parliament, and a special consultant for the Speaker of Iraqi Parliament. Previously she worked in international development programs as a country director for Counterpart International-Iraq program implementing USAID and UN funded programs in AI Anbar, Karbala, Baghdad, and Erbil. She is currently a PhD candidate at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.

Muhamed Al Maliky is a medical doctor by training and formalized his political training through an MPA degree from Harvard's Kennedy School. He also held three years of fellowship at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs leading research on Iraq. He is starting a research institute by the name of the Iraqi American Institute that aims at providing informed analysis on Iraq from both Iraqi and American sources.

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EXP-0064-F/EXP-0164-F Ethics in Human Subjects Research
0.5 Credit, Pass/Fail Grading
Monday 6:00-8:30pm

This course is being offered as a pilot course for a study in research ethics and methodology to undergraduate and graduate students who plan to conduct independent research studies with human subjects. The objective of the course is to prepare students for the challenges faced in domestic and international research, and to provide a framework for how to deal with these individual challenges in their own research. The class will be case study and project based in order to reinforce the importance of conducting research with integrity and in an objective way while recognizing the unique characteristics of various methodological approaches.

The course will guide students through ethics in research and case studies on research misconduct. Students will learn how to design a methodologically sound project that supports research concepts using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies; the difference between anonymity and confidentiality; and how these concepts apply to the protection of their data. Using each of these topics, they will construct a research prospectus that will adhere to IRB regulations.

PLEASE NOTE: THIS COURSE STARTS ON SEPTEMBER 21ST.

Lara Sloboda is the Institutional Review Board Administrator for Tufts' Social, Behavioral, and Educational IRB. In addition to her role in the Office for the Vice Provost for Research, she is a lecturer in the department of Psychology at Tufts and has taught both Introduction to Psychology and Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences. She holds a PhD in Psychology from Tufts.

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EXP-0070-F The Law of Search and Seizure in the Digital Age
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Tuesday 6:00-8:30PM

Can the NSA legally seize metadata regarding my phone calls and text messages from service providers in the name of national security? Can police attach a GPS device to my car to monitor my travels? Can border agents access the contents of my laptop when I return from a trip abroad? Can the government use drones to track my every move?

This course will explore the history and applications of the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which secures the right of the people ''to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects" against "unreasonable search and seizures" by the government. We will consider the ramifications of the fact that, in 1791, the framers of the Constitution could not have envisioned the numerous electronic storage devices on which we all record the most personal aspects of our lives, nor the types of high tech tools currently available to law enforcement agencies to keep track of our activities. And we will debate the rationale for the many Court-created exceptions to the Amendment's warrant requirement and how the Supreme Court and lower federal courts are applying these rationales to current modern technology.

Christopher Doherty recently retired from his position as Assistant Chief Counsel, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Boston, within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Prior to the creation of the Department of Homeland Security he was the Assistant Chief Counsel, U.S. Customs Service, Boston. Doherty completed his Juris Doctor in 1974 at Boston College Law School.

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EXP-0072-F Bad Parents, Troubled Children: Child Abuse and the Law
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30PM

What should we, as a community, do about bad parents and troubled children? What are the legal options? How well are our legal and governmental systems addressing these challenges?

This course presents students with the opportunity to explore the legal and substantive issues involved in societal response to child abuse and neglect. A vexing problem that tends to evoke strong individual emotions and opinions as well as questionable legal and governmental decision-making in response, the field of child abuse and neglect will present a context for students to apply legal precedent, personal experience, and substantive knowledge from disciplines ranging from child development, psychology, and sociology to history, religion, and politics, to actual case studies. Taught from a legal perspective, this course will encourage students to approach issues objectively, refine their rhetorical skills, and maintain an open mind as they seek solutions to difficult situations with enormous consequences for some of our most vulnerable children and families.

Andrew Hoffman is the Managing Attorney for the Boston office of the Children and Family Law Division of the Committee for Public Counsel Services, which is the state public defender agency. He represents parents and children in child abuse and neglect cases in the Juvenile and Probate Courts in Boston and Cambridge, and has been in this field of law for fifteen years.

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EXP-0076-F Accused: The Gap Between Law and Justice
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Thursday 6:30-9:00PM

The law is all around us, but what about justice? What is justice? What kind of justice are we entitled to?

Together we will explore the concepts, framework, systems and practices which comprise what justice is, with an emphasis on the perspective of the wrongfully accused. Through the use of drama, film, case studies, media analysis, and other sources, we will consider the factors which shape our personal views of what justice is, decide how much these views really matter, and examine the many factors that determine how systems of justice impact society on various levels.

Sonja Spears (J '86) is a retired elected judge with 12 years of service in the New Orleans judiciary. Despite her unblemished legal career, Sonja recently endured two years of intense scrutiny as the target of a federal criminal investigation. She was ultimately cleared without any charges being filed, and the office in charge of her prosecution is currently facing questions of prosecutorial misconduct. Sonja received her JD from Tulane Law School.

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EXP-0084-F The Business of Sports: A Study of the NBA
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Monday, 6:00-8:30PM

Professional sports has evolved from the "mom and pop" environment of 30 years ago, to that of a sophisticated, high risk, high profile, "big business." Current events in pro-sports are documented in virtually every major newspaper and periodical in the country. In our daily lives it's hard to avoid exposure to sports in some form or another, yet many off-field issues are confusing to the casual (and maybe not so casual) fan.

This course is intended to make sense out of the confusion by providing an overview of the pro-sports industry as a business. Subjects for inquiry will include the development of the National Basketball Association from the late 1960s through the present. Assigned readings will be principally from original N.B.A. operational documents, and will provide a fundamental understanding of the concepts, theories, and terms related to general sports business/legal issues, and the N.B.A. in particular.

Jan Volk currently serves as a consultant to a number of N.B.A. teams. After earning a J.D. from Columbia in 1971, he went to work for the Boston Celtics and, in 1984, was named General Manager, a position he held until May 1997. As G.M., he was responsible for the acquisition, contractual negotiation, re-negotiation, and ultimate signing of all Celtics players.

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EXP-0090-AF Teaching Explorations
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading
Monday, 12:00-1:15PM

This course is designed to facilitate undergraduate team-teaching for those leading first-semester seminars for incoming first-year students. Weekly group meetings will be held, in which student teachers will be exposed to a range of teaching techniques and theories, asked to articulate their course goals, and given a forum for discussing the unique problems that new teachers often encounter. Students will be required to keep journals, and reflect upon the concerns and questions that arise over the course of the semester.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.

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EXP-0090-BF Teaching Perspectives
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading
Monday, 12:00-1:15PM

Similar to the Explorations Seminar, this course supports students teaching a Perspectives course, all of whom will work under the umbrella topic of movies as both art and industry.

Howard Woolf is the Associate Director of the Experimental College.

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EXP-0090-TF Teaching Assistant Workshop
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading
ARR

This course is designed to assist the undergraduates who are teaching assistants for courses in the Experimental College.

Howard Woolf is the Associate Director of the Experimental College.

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EXP-0091-F EPIIC: The Future of Europe
1.0 credit, Letter Grading
Tuesday and Thursday, 3:00-5:30, Terrace Room, Paige Hall

"A united Europe is not a modern expedient, be it political or economic, but an ideal which has been accepted since thousands of years by the best spirits of Europe, namely those who can see into the future. Already Homer described Zeus as
'europos' – an adjective meaning 'one who sees very far.'" — Denis de Rougemont, Vingt-huit siecles d'Europe (1961)
For much of the last three centuries, European order was the world order – a product of the interests, ambitions and rivalries of the continent's empires. It is the birthplace of the Enlightenment and codified human rights, as well as fascism, "scientific" racism and the colonial "civilizing" mission.

What are the challenges that Europe faces – literally and conceptually – in the 21st century? How will it define itself? And be defined? Is it on the cusp of a new threshold that challenges its core sense of citizenship, identities and philosophical concepts?

This course will consider the future of Europe through multiple prisms: from the antecedents of Church-State relations to contemporary tensions over secularism; the collapse of Communism and Russia's seizure of Crimea; from Hobbe's theories of social contract and the fundamentals of liberal thought to Arendt's "perplexities" regarding citizenship and statelessness and the migration crises; from the Treaty of Westphalia and the future of the state to the Treaty of Maastricht and the future of the eurozone; from the ascendance of neo-liberal economics and debates over austerity to the Copenhagen Accord on climate change; from the borderless Schengen Agreement to the future of collective security and NATO; from the Declaration of Human Rights and individual rights to the tensions that arose over Charlie Hebdo and freedom of expression/hate speech and the Dublin Regulation on asylum seekers.

This course is High Demand. Interested students MUST attend the first class meeting.

Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts, and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds an MA from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

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EXP-0096-F Auditing for Breadth
0.5-1.0 credits, Pass/Fail Grading
ARR

This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years as an undergraduate. (One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits.) Please note: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.

Howard Woolf is the Associate Director of the Experimental College.

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EXP-0099-CF Media Internships
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading
ARR

Supervised internship in communications and mass media. Students can intern at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet approved by instructor. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hours a week), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. Registration by consent of instructor. Student should consult with instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register.

Leslie Goldberg (J '84) is the founder of Blue Sun Communications, a corporate communications consulting firm. She holds an MS in Mass Communication from Boston University.

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EXP-0101-CF: Advanced Filmmaking
0.5-1.0 credits, Letter Grading
ARR

Based on a directed study model, this course is for students who can demonstrate -- through coursework or personal experience -- that they are ready to go to the next level in their training as filmakers. Students who initially qualify will present a business plan for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. Students will watch a negotiated number of source films, keep a Producer's Log, and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through to produce their film and their reaction to the film once it is done.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks, co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.

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EXP-0102-CF: Advanced Digital Media
0.5-1.0 credits, Letter Grading
ARR

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks, co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.

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EXP-0110-F Communicating Change: The Tufts 1+4 Bridge Year Experience
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Yearlong
ARR

Students will explore their Bridge Year service experience through related readings, investigative data collection, guided exploration of social issues, service placements and host communities, and reflections. Through a variety of communication exercises, faculty guidance and peer interaction, this course will enhance the Bridge Year experience by creating a framework for students to make connections between the work they and their peers are doing both at the local and global level. Participants will learn specific communication skills for translating social change experiences to a broader public. They will consider how their Bridge Year experience connects to their future academic interests and possible impact on campus life once they return.

This course is only open to Tufts 1+4 Bridge Year participants.

Felicia Sullivan is Senior Researcher with Tisch College's Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement (CIRCLE).

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EXP-190-AF: CMS Senior Colloquium
0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading
Wednesday, 12:00PM-12:50PM

All C.MS seniors thinking about completing a Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the C.MS Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aims to help seniors develop their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Please note: Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Come to her office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 8, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Leslie Goldberg (J '84) is the founder of Blue Sun Communications, a corporate communications consulting firm. She holds a MS in Mass Communication from Boston University.

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EXP-190-BF: CMS Senior Colloquium
0.5 credits, Pass/Fail Grading
Thursday, 9:30-10:20AM

All CMS seniors thinking about completing a Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the CMS Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aims to help seniors develop their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Please note: Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Come to her office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 8, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Julie Dobrow is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a PhD in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.

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EXP-0192-F Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credits, Letter Grading
ARR

By arrangement only.

Topics must fall within the range of courses taught by the Experimental College. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call 617-627-3384.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College.

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EXP-0192-PF: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credits, Pass/Fail Grading
ARR

By arrangement only.

Topics must fall within the range of courses taught by the Experimental College. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call 617-627-3384.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College.

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EXP-0194-HF CMS Senior Project
0.5 credits, Letter Grading
ARR

For CMS Minors only. All CMS minors completing their Senior Projects this semester must register for this class.

NOTE: THIS SECTION IS FOR THOSE CMS MINORS WHO ARE DOING HALF-CREDIT SENIOR PROJECTS.

Julie Dobrow is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a PhD in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.

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EXP-0194-FF CMS Senior Project
1.0 credits, Letter Grading
ARR

For CMS Minors only. All CMS minors completing their Senior Projects this semester must register for this class.

NOTE: THIS SECTION IS FOR THOSE CMS MINORS WHO ARE DOING FULL CREDIT SENIOR PROJECTS.

Julie Dobrow is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a PhD in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.

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95 Talbot Ave., Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155  | Tel: 617-627-3384  | Fax: 617-627-3449  |  Email