Courses:Current Courses

Spring 2015 Courses

This page was last updated on 01/12/2015.


EXP-0003-S. Gender, Sexuality, and Comics
Monday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

From the hyper-masculine bodies of the typical male superhero to the bondage motifs in Wonder Woman's origins, mainstream comic books and gender have always had an interesting relationship -- for better and for worse.

This course is an in-depth examination of how comic books have been used to explore questions of gender, sex, sexuality, gender differences, and gender socialization. Throughout the course, students will examine how ideas about gender and identity in comics are shaped by popular culture, advertising, modes of production, and debates on censorship. In particular, this course pays special attention to how gender and sexuality vary across ethnic, racial, and class lines. By looking at the complex and vast history of comics in the 20th century, students will critically engage with questions of gender and sexual identity, stereotypes, and societal roles and their "graphic" (mis)representation.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Humanities Elective.

Nhora Serrano is a Visiting Scholar of Comparative Literature at Harvard University who recently taught An Introduction to Comics and the Graphic Novel in the Experimental College. A recipient of a Smithsonian Fellowship, Nhora's most recent work includes two monographs: Medieval Iberian Visuality: The Alfonsine Scriptorium's Wartime Critique and Configuring Mimesis Graphically: Comics and Fine Arts. Currently, she's finishing a third monograph, The Myth and Modernism of Remedios Varo: Arachne Entwined.

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EXP-0004-S. The Corset and the Crown: The History and Politics of Fashion
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

How do politics and gender perceptions intertwine, as both women's and men's roles and fashions seem to be constantly in a state of flux? Why do humans feel the need to change their clothing constantly?

This course looks at changes in Western dress from the age of the Renaissance to the retro trends of today by focusing on issues of body and sexuality as well as political power and global influence. We will examine how clothing acts as a vehicle for political and social meaning. We will both explore everyday meanings related to how we dress and historical concerns embedded in the study of dress -- a venture that is uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between large-scale historical events and the micro-history of individuals and communities.

Alexandra van den Berg (G '12) has worked with the costume collection of the Slater Memorial Museum and the American Textile History Museum. She has sewn historically accurate garments for displays in both institutions. Her recent projects include research in the role of clothing in the aftermath of the French Revolution and hand-sewing a pair of 18th century stays. Alexandra is a graduate of the Tufts Museum Studies master's program and successfully taught this course previously in the Experimental College.

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EXP-0005-S. "The Bridge": Cambridge Yesterday and Today

Tuesday/Thursday, 6:00-7:15
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading

In this course, students will explore Cambridge through new lenses. We will examine Cambridge's different neighborhoods through the perspectives of race, socio-economic status, history, education, and sociology. This class relies on project-based learning, as students will go out into Cambridge and use the city as their classroom. Students will conduct oral histories with Cambridge residents, think about the city as a place of conflict, and study local politics. Our investigations will be supported by guest lectures from Cambridge policymakers and activists. Any student interested in the history, present, or future of American cities will certainly benefit from this class.

Abbie Cohen is a senior at Tufts majoring in Psychology. She is a lifelong resident of Cambridge. The basis for teaching this class was her experience in the CITYterm program.

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EXP-0006-S. Medical Spanish

Monday/Wednesday, 6:00-7:15
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This course provides an overview of the practice of Spanish-language medical interpretation. Students will build their skills in communication, ethics, and medical vocabulary, including psychology and psychiatry, while exploring questions of culture and advocacy.

Students will have an opportunity to practice interpretation in a simulated medical setting by emphasizing the following areas: bilingual fluency for social and medical conversation; interpreting skills and techniques; the code of ethics for medical interpreters (in relation to that of doctors); health beliefs and practices in a range of Spanish-speaking cultures; and cross-cultural communications challenges in the medical setting. Instruction is geared toward students with intermediate to advanced language skills and will reinforce students' prior knowledge of Spanish grammar. This course will be taught in Spanish.

Josep Vicente is currently a medical interpreter with Medical Interpreters of the North Shore. Born and raised in Spain, he holds a degree in Romance Languages and Linguistics from the Universitat de Barcelona and has successfully taught this course a number of times in the Experimental College.

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EXP-0007-S. Growing Up at Hogwarts: Young Adult Literature and Adolescent Identity

Tuesday/Thursday, 6:00-7:15
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading

How does young adult literature affect adolescent development and sense of identity? What do we learn from Harry's fight against Voldemort and Katniss' resistance against the Capitol? What does dystopia teach us about whom we could be, if given the chance?

In this class, we will attempt to find the answers through close reading of young adult literature, in particular novels targeted at the millennial generation -- those of us currently between the ages of thirteen and twenty-one. With the help of psychological literature and popular media, we will find out how these books speak to us at different stages of development, using Erikson's stages of psychosocial development as a backbone for the course. The course will be theoretical, personal, and creative, and will encompass a wide range of genres and styles within contemporary YA fiction -- from JK Rowling to Stephen Chbosky to Suzanne Collins. We will discuss common, influential themes such as depictions of community, romance, and identity while investigating the vehicles YA writers use to depict them.

Priyanka Dharampuriya is a senior at Tufts majoring in Biology and minoring in English and hopes to someday work in the medical and public health fields with a focus on adolescent health. She has worked as a Child Life volunteer at Boston Children's Hospital and as a researcher at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and UMass Medical School. On campus, she is an Arts writer for the Tufts Daily.

Nivedhitha Ramesh is a junior at Tufts majoring in Biopsychology. She does research at the Avian Visual Cognition lab, serves on TEMS, and is a mentor for the Tufts chapter of Strong Women Strong Girls.

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EXP-0013-S. Great-Great-Grandparents: Discovering Your History
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

How did your great-great-grandparents understand their times? What events, individual and collective, shaped their lives?

In this course students will research the places, times, and life of one of their sixteen great-great-grandparents, focusing on the analytical category of generation. An under-examined but universal component of human identity, generation, like race, class, gender, nation, and ethnicity, is a social construct, formed by experiences in (and memories of) the coming-of-age years. In writing a short biography of their ancestor, students will apply several of the career-building skills that humanities courses contain, such as interviewing, critical reading and viewing, collaboration, time management, multitasking, and verbal and written presentation.

Scott Spencer is a Visiting Scholar in the Department of History at Tufts. He is currently at work on a book in which he tells a group story of the lives and times of imperial administrators who came of age at the turn of the twentieth century. He holds a Ph.D. in History from the University of Virginia.

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EXP-0014-S. Exorcism: Ritual and Analysis
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

For centuries, religions have engaged in rituals to cure the "possessed."

This course focuses on the interaction with what are usually termed "demons" or "evil spirits" in the form of exorcism. To do so, students will engage with this phenomenon along a number of trajectories, including film analysis, interviews, and close readings of historical texts that will draw on diverse anthropological, sociological, and historical perspectives for their collective insights. Students will be encouraged to critically consider what may be an unfamiliar practice, while also allowing this unfamiliarity to challenge and trouble their own taken-for-granted world views.

Ryan Knowles is a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University researching exorcism and magic in Ancient Christianity. With background and expertise in a wide range of subjects, from Hebrew Bible to early modern alchemy and the modern occult, Ryan has engaged with the academic community and the general public alike on the topic of exorcism.

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EXP-0015-S. Food, Law, and Policy
Thursday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This class will introduce students to the U.S. food system: how laws and policies shape the ways that the food we eat is produced, distributed, marketed, and made available to different populations. Students will begin by learning about the difference between programs and policies and examining food policy-making at the federal, state, and local levels.

They will then engage with the most controversial and complex topics in food policy. From industrial agriculture to the health implications of our food system to alternative food movements, students will become familiar with the foundational legal context of each topic. After extensive discussion, they will be asked to take positions and form arguments to support existing or creative new policies. Through debates, role-plays, and oral presentations, students will emerge from this course with a deep understanding of the ongoing legal and policy dialogue about our domestic food system.

Sarah Downer is a Clinical Instructor at the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation at Harvard Law School. She has a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

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EXP-0016-S. Understanding Animal Welfare
Thursday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

How do we define animal welfare and how can we measure it?

In this class we will consider why the issue of animal welfare -- and the emotional debate about animal use in research, food production and other aspects of our lives -- continue to grow. We will then examine the push for public policies that improve the welfare of animals. In order to do so, the class will provide students with an overview of the science behind animal welfare and its importance in our interactions with animals. In particular we will discuss approaches to measuring animal experiences and behavioral needs as well as ways to improve their current environment based on what we know about their needs.

Winnie Chan is currently a farm animal welfare auditor. Her research interests focus in behavioral differences between wild and captive animals, and in behaviors that could be used for animal welfare assessment. She holds a Ph.D. from Washington State University in Animal Science.

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EXP-0017-S. Exploring Unconscious Bias: A Personal Approach
Monday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

What is the impact of unconscious bias on our relationships? How can we begin to better understand these powerful topics and manage them more satisfactorily in our lives?

This course will focus on gaining a better understanding of attitudes toward diversity, our own and others, and the impact of unconscious bias. We will do so by considering the impacts of diversity in our schools, in the workplace and in our communities. The class will be interactive – emphasizing self-reflection through journal writing -- and will also employ such assessment tools as the Perception Assumption Model, the Diversity Wheel, and the Harvard Implicit Association Test.

Laura Kangas has been working internationally in the area of diversity and unconscious bias for over twenty years. In 1987, she founded and has continued to manage her own consulting firm, River Bend Associates. She holds a Master's Degree from Harvard University which focused on Adult and Organizational Development and Cross Cultural Counseling.

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EXP-0018-S. Personal Career Development
Tuesday, 4:30-6:00
0.5 Course Credit, Pass/Fail Grading

Based on an examination of several major career development theories, student will apply key concepts to their own career development process, focusing on thoughtful self-reflection, major and career exploration, and the value of internships as a tool in the exploration and decision-making process. Through reading assignments, analysis, and writing, students will discover more about themselves and the world of work. This course is ideally suited to sophomores who are beginning the career planning and decision-making process.

Betsy McDowell is a seasoned career development professional with significant experience and skill in career counseling, presentation, and classroom instruction. Recently retired from Suffolk University, Betsy served as Associate Director of Career Services for over twenty years. There she counseled undergraduate students and alumni on a wide range of career assessment and job search issues, and presented workshops on a variety of career development topics. She also served on the President's Commission for Diversity Affairs. Betsy currently holds an Adjunct Faculty appointment at the Suffolk University Sawyer Business School, where she has been teaching undergraduate courses on career development, strategy and management for the past seventeen years. She has an M.S. in Counseling from Suffolk University, and an MBA from Northeastern University.

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EXP-0020-S. Chemistry in Everyday Life
Monday, Wednesday, 6:00-7:15
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading

Have you ever wondered what all those chemicals lying around your house really do? Do you know what's really in that pain relief pill? We use chemicals in so many aspects of our lives -- how do they work? Simple concepts from chemistry can explain all of these questions.

If you are curious to learn more about how the world works, this course is for you. Many science courses teach the bare science first and leave you to extrapolate the real-world applications -- this course is the opposite. We will examine various aspects of your life (food chemistry, household chemistry, medicines/biochemistry) and delve into how these work, focusing on your usage of these products and effects on health. After each class, consisting of short presentations and active group discussion, you will walk away with a greater understanding of your everyday life and the chemical principles that fundamentally shape the world. You'll never look at a recipe or ingredient list the same way.

Jordin Metz is a junior at Tufts University majoring in Chemistry. He is involved in the Tufts Sustainability Collective, the Model United Nations team, and is a competitive member of the Tufts Ballroom Dance Team.

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EXP-0021-S. The Chemistry of Cooking: Science in the Kitchen
Monday/Wednesday, 6:00-7:15
One Course Credit, Pass/Fail Grading

Like to cook? Want to learn the tricks of the trade? Looking to expand the scope of cultural culinary knowledge?

In this course, we will explore how chemistry is something we exercise everyday, especially when it comes to cooking. Looking at the practice of cooking through a scientific lens, we can answer basic questions such as "why do we cook meat?" in addition to more complex questions such as "what is the chemical basis of an emulsion?" We will also consider how cooking at the Michelin star level is becoming more and more chemistry involved. We will pay particular attention to how such gastronomists (chefs/chemists) as Ferran Adria of El Bulli, Grant Achatz of Alinea, and Wylie Dufresne of WD-50 blend the two fields of cooking and chemistry in creative and innovative ways; ways that we aim to explore, understand, and replicate.

Cooking experience is highly recommended, in addition to prior biology and chemistry education (minimum high school level education).

Ezra Schwartz is a junior at Tufts majoring in Biology. An amateur chef and food enthusiast, he enjoys combining his love for science with his love for food.

Theo Friedman is a senior at Tufts majoring in American Studies and Entrepreneurial Leadership Studies. The past four years he has explored food, cooking and the science behind it all from Spain to Thailand, Japan and the Netherlands. Having worked in Michelin starred restaurants in New York and Boston, Theo continues his love for cooking with private underground dining events throughout the year.

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EXP-0024-S. Life in Motion: Documenting Movement in Nature
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

FREEZE!!

As hard as you might try, you are never completely still: cells are dividing, neurons are firing, and blood is rushing away from your heart. In fact, all of life is movement. From the subatomic motion of molecules to the migration of birds across the globe, life never stands still.

In this class, we will explore how movement shapes life in the natural world through the lens of documentation: How does the way in which we view, record, and visualize movement affect our understanding of pattern and process in the natural world? We will pay special attention to how technologies such as high-speed or time-lapse photography allow us to explore movements that are too fast, too slow, too small, or too big for the human eye to see, and discuss how these technologies change our understanding of movement in the natural world. Students will have the chance to actively explore the process of visualizing nature by creating their own nature documentaries as a final project for the course.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice Elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an Elective.

Glenna Clifton is a Ph.D. candidate in the Organismic and Evolutionary Biology department at Harvard University. She studies diving birds that use their feet to produce underwater forces to ask how these swimming strategies relate to anatomical and behavioral differences among species.

James Crall is a Ph.D. candidate in the Organismic and Evolutionary Biology department at Harvard University. He studies how insects fly through complex natural environments and cope with the challenges they find there.

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EXP-0025-S. Energy Choices toward a Sustainable Future
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

How long can we keep relying on fossil fuels? What are the alternatives?

This course will explore our energy options. We will consider how, after nearly a century of industrial societies relying heavily on fossil fuels, we will consider the affect of environmental concerns and how they have shaped our decisions to choose alternative energy sources. In doing so, we will examine the economical, political and technological challenges. The course will focus on four modules, namely, fossil fuels, solar energy, bioenergy, and nuclear energy. Each module will discuss a basic energy source, using the following structure: a) basic concepts and scientific principles, b) current applied techniques and consumption, and c) opportunities for future development and challenges to implementation. The goal of this format is to provide students with an ability to understand the current energy and environmental challenges and to propose solutions that can be implemented and make a meaningful impact.

Nan Yi is a research associate at Tufts interested in developing effective methods to improve science and engineering learning and to engage students' participation in STEM fields. He holds a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Tufts and recently had an appointment as a postdoctoral associate at Yale.

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EXP-0029-S. Wonder, Purpose, and Scientific Momentum

Tuesday/Thursday, 6:00-7:15
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading

Some would argue that science "ruins the magic," that it makes us feel insignificant and mechanized. The world we know seems to be uncontrollable and always at risk for some new eradication. But can science, just as powerfully, convince us that that there is poetry in reality?

This class will examine our relationship with science, as both an interpreter of the natural world and as part of the magic. This class will explore why we ask questions, and the natural process of seeking out answers. It will overwhelm with the vastness and intricacies of what we do know, an attempt to dissect and prove our significance. It will examine our history with science, and discuss the trajectory of our relationship with science -- in education, religion, and culture.

Megan Wyllie is a senior at Tufts majoring in Geological Science and is interested in teaching high school life and earth sciences after graduation. She has led canoeing, backpacking, and conservation focused expeditions for the past four summers and has a strong passion for making science experiential and inspiring.

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EXP-0030-S. Sabermetrics: The Objective Analysis of Baseball
Thursday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This course will teach the fundamentals of the emerging science of Sabermetrics, the objective analysis of baseball. In addition, and where appropriate, we will explore the science of baseball scouting.

Students will discuss baseball not through conventional wisdom and consensus, but by searching for knowledge concerning the game of baseball. Hitting, pitching, fielding performance, along with other areas of Sabermetrics, will be analyzed and better understood with current and historical baseball data. Students will design and implement their own Sabermetric research study, learning the important concepts in statistical analysis needed to perform this research.

Andy Andres (N '99) is a Senior Lecturer in Natural Sciences at Boston University, a Data Analyst at BaseballHQ.com, and a die-hard Red Sox fan.

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EXP-0031-S Education in Contemporary America
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

The quality of education in America has been analyzed and examined by policymakers, practitioners, and stakeholders alike. How does America compare to other countries? What are the factors that influence positive educational outcomes? What does education look like based on race, gender and class?

Through discussions, readings, media analysis, and on-the-ground experiences, this course will lay the foundation for unpacking the history of education in America, analyzing some of its most sensitive issues, and examining the policies that impact students today.

Jasmine Porter-Rallins is a researcher, community organizer, and curriculum writer. Currently, she is a teacher in the Boston Public Schools. She's taught and worked in the South and in India. A graduate of Spellman, she holds an M.E. in International Education Policy form the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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EXP-0032-S. Adoption: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

What do Harry Potter, Batman, Marilyn Monroe, Babe Ruth, Malcolm X, and Steve Jobs have in common?

They were all members of an adoption story. While each person (fictional or otherwise) has a different experience -- being orphaned, being fostered, and being adopted -- they share a common experience of being part of a family (or families) that was disrupted.

In this course, we will touch on just about everything adoption-related from the wide range of adoption stories both well known and oft neglected. We will also consider such questions as: How much do you know about adoption? What is an orphan? What is it like to be adopted? Why does any of it matter? In addition, we will focus on the importance of diversity within family formation and identity development.

This course has been cross-listed with Child Development as CD-0143-10.

Jessica Matthews has been studying adoption and unparented children for the last decade in different sites around the world. She is currently an advanced Ph.D. candidate in the Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Study and Human Development at Tufts University.

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EXP-0033-S. Tufts Community Emergency Response Team
Tuesday, 4:30-5:45
0.5 Course Credit, Pass/Fail Grading

The T-CERT course provides students with the skills required by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to serve as a Community Emergency Response Team member within their campus community. Completion of this training will provide the student with the basic skills they may need in the aftermath of a disaster or other emergency and the opportunity to assist the Tufts Community and the Department of Public Safety by joining T-CERT. By working together, T-CERT members can assist in saving lives and protecting property using the skills gained in this course. This course meets FEMA and Emergency Management Institute (EMI) requirements for CERT training.

Matthew Hart is a Continuity Planning Specialist in the Department of Public & Environmental Safety. In this role he assists departments across the university in developing their own plans to cope with emergencies and disasters. He received a B.S. in emergency management from Massachusetts Maritime Academy and has earned the Associate Emergency Manager credential through the International Association of Emergency Managers.

Mark Roche is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and a certified CERT Instructor. He also serves as a CERT Team Leader and Operations Captain with a local Emergency Management agency. He is currently an instructor for the Experimental College teaching the Rape Aggression Defense for Women and Advanced Rape Aggression Defense courses.

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EXP-0035-AS. Rape Aggression Defense
Monday, 4:30-6:30
0.5 Course Credit, Pass/Fail Grading

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self-defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Mark Roche and Kerry Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.

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EXP-0035-BS. Rape Aggression Defense
Thursday, 4:30-6:30
0.5 Course Credit, Pass/Fail Grading

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self-defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Ashley Deitrick and Matthew Robertson are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.

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EXP-0036-S. Advanced Rape Aggression Defense
Wednesday, 4:30-6:30
0.5 Course Credit, Pass/Fail Grading

Advanced Rape Aggression Defense (Advanced RAD) is a continuation of the Basic program and answers a lot of the "what if" questions. The program will begin with a review of the basic program followed by simulation. This course is more hands on than the basic program and includes topics such as defending against multiple attackers and defense against weapons such as knives and guns. Throughout the course, the instructors will conduct realistic simulation training using impact targets and facilitate discussions on sexual assault, crime prevention and personal protection.

Mark Roche and Kerri Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.

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EXP-0039-S. 9/11, Arab Spring, Ebola: Communication Amid Crisis
Thursday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

How is Japan's triple disaster of earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown similar to the Cuban Missile Crisis? What about the disappearance of Malaysian Air 370? What do these dramatic events share in common with the terrorism pandemic following 9/11 or the global response to ISIL? They are all examples of communication amid crisis.

This unconventional course of cases, strategies, lessons, and outcomes differs from the normal crisis communication course in that it is: interdisciplinary, historical, sociological, cross-cultural and media centered. It tells us about the world we live in as well as human behavior under conditions of fear, uncertainty, disruption and change. Whereas most courses examine crisis communication from a public relations perspective (what should a company have known? how should it have responded? what about its internal structure dynamics produced the particular reaction?), this course is global and comparative, looking at human response on a wide ranges of issues including natural disasters, wars, social unrest, human accident, health epidemics, terrorist threats and popular phenomena. The actors treated include governments, citizens, corporations, consumers, news media, victims, and external observers. Key forms of communication include: rumor, propaganda, public speeches, official statements, government policy, news coverage, leaked or unauthorized mediations, information campaigns, advertisements, social media reaction, and more. Among the many aims of the course is that students should emerge better able to perceive the types of communication challenges, attempts, successes, and failures that underlie the many events unfolding around them each day.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice Elective.

Todd Holden is currently an Associate in Research at Harvard University's Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies. Author of the recent novel, Mr. Big Maus, he is currently completing two works of fiction about Japan's triple disaster of 2011: Tsunami and Escape from Sonoyo. He holds a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Social Science from Syracuse University's Maxwell School.

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EXP-0041-S "Education 4 Active Citizenship"
Wednesday, 10:30-1:15
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This course is specifically designed to prepare first year students for the Tisch Scholars Program. Only students who have been pre-selected for the E4AC program are permitted to enroll. In this course, students will begin to build a framework for civic engagement. Through selected readings, class discussions, guest speakers, and experiential work, students will think about how change is created in a community-based setting. In order to be effective as college-student agents for change, as well as lifelong active citizens, class members will study the relationships between Tufts University and its host communities. Students will become familiar with both historical and current issues facing these communities and ways in which Tufts students and community residents are making a difference.

Aviva Luz Argote draws on eighteen years in the nonprofit and public sectors facilitating group processes, creating generative workplace cultures and building relationships among diverse stakeholders. Most recently, she directed Harvard University's Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations where she managed global civil society research teams, and taught courses on transformational leadership, collaborative team design, nonprofit finance and fundraising. Her prior professional experience has focused on higher education administration, social sector leadership and bringing voice to historically marginalized communities, including work with the RAND Corporation, Los Angeles County, and Coro leadership centers.

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EXP-0042-S. The Right to Privacy in Modern America
Monday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Warrantless wiretapping? No-knock raids? E-mail and credit hacks?

Each and every one of these issues, and far more, have arisen before the United States Supreme Court in recent years, expanding and contracting the breadth and scope of our right to privacy. Even in a new era of government, the scope of the right to privacy remains at the forefront of the collective American conscience.

This course will explore how Constitutional law has shaped the nature of the right to privacy and how the right may be evolving in modern America. We will concentrate on three particular areas: (1) privacy rights specifically enumerated in the Constitution, (2) privacy rights that have been read into the constitution, and (3) emerging ideas that may necessitate the extension or expansion of historically-established concepts of privacy.

Douglas Martland is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice Gary Katzmann of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts.

Steven Sharobem is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice William Cowin of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts.

This course has been successfully taught a number of times in the Experimental College.

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EXP-0045-S. Disability Studies
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

How do blind people use paper money? Are Americans with disabilities more likely to be poor? How do people with disabilities narrate cultural expectations? How do they challenge or redefine them?

This course aims to introduce students to an interdisciplinary study of disability. We will use personal narratives in artistic, new media, epistolary, memoir, and poetic forms to examine how individuals with disabilities relate to a range of social and cultural contexts. We also aim to explore the role of the non-disabled in shaping disability cultures. Finally, we will introduce and interrogate how and when disability intersects with feminist, queer, racial, economic, and international boundaries.

Aubry Threlkeld has been working on disability issues in educational settings for the last thirteen years. He is an independent educational consultant, resident tutor, and advanced Ph.D. student at Harvard University.

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EXP-0046-S. Experimenting with Philanthropy
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Philanthropy plays many roles in our communities, from alleviating crisis situations to encouraging strategic, systemic change. Nonprofit organizations are the intermediaries connecting donors to community needs. Working with a grant from the Highland Street Foundation students have the opportunity to practice philanthropy by serving as a young adult grant-making board to award $10,000 to local nonprofits in the cities of Medford, Somerville, and Chinatown.

Students will learn about different styles of philanthropy and effective nonprofit management; how to think about and evaluate impact as a philanthropist; how to run a community project; how to read nonprofit financials and assess nonprofit organizational health and potential; sources of philanthropic news, and thinking; and trends in philanthropy and nonprofit management. Students will design their own process for requesting grant proposals and evaluating applications. The process of selecting grant recipients will bring students very close to the local community.

Class taught in a Socratic style, encouraging students to learn together through discussion and projects. A number of community philanthropists and nonprofit leaders will join our class discussions, offering the opportunity to learn directly from those in the field.

This course is supported by a grant from the Highland Street Foundation.

Nancy Lippe has developed and led nonprofit programs in schools and communities for the last fifteen years, focusing on conflict resolution, philanthropy, college access/perseverance, and art/nature discovery. Her work has involved being both a grant seeker and a grant maker, resulting in a great appreciation for the opportunities and challenges of both sides. She holds a doctorate in education from the Fielding Graduate University. She has taught this course previously in the Experimental College.

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EXP-0050-S. Health and Illness in the Media
Monday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

More than 3.5 million people tune in each weekday to watch Dr. Oz diagnose America. Raw data and images from the worst Ebola outbreak in history stream across Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram in near real-time. Angelina Jolie announces her preventive double mastectomy in the New York Times. For better or worse, we are now exposed to an unprecedented amount of information on human health.

This class takes a critical look at how the complexity of illness is distilled across mediums and seeks to understand how media consumers evaluate and digest the information. We will deconstruct the dramatic illness narratives that saturate the popular press and consider how the ethical implications of health communications differ from other spheres. What happens to science, patient privacy, and dignity, as journalists, filmmakers, politicians, and advertisers attempt to engage lay audiences on diseases that are not yet fully understood by the medical community? Students will be exposed to a variety of texts, films, and guest speakers as they consider how disruptive shifts in the media landscape have altered our understanding of public health.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice Elective.

Chris Sweeney is an award-winning science and health writer. Currently he is Senior Editor at Partners In Health (PIH), a global health nonprofit, founded by Drs. Paul Farmer, Jim Kim, and Ophelia Dahl, that works to strengthen health systems in some of the poorest areas of the world.

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EXP-0051-CS. Advanced Narrative and Documentary Practice
Friday, 10:00am-12:00pm plus Individual Tutorials
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Narrative and Documentary Practice taught last fall in the Experimental College.

Each student will produce his or her proposed story under the individual guidance of the instructor. Student projects can employ a wide range of storytelling styles, including but not limited to investigative, historical, biographical, and autobiographical. They can address significant social, economic, political, and environmental issues, as well as capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The students will work closely with the instructor and other practitioners, constantly crafting and editing their projects and developing their own unique voice. Each project will be scrutinized for thorough and accurate research, original and ethically grounded reporting, and engaging storytelling. At the end of the semester, the stories will be published on the web. In addition, students will have regular opportunities to meet collectively, engage in peer review, and share stylistic and workflow strategies.

Please Note: While this course is designed as the logical next step for students who've completed the introductory level class in the fall, individuals who did not participate in the fall class may contact the instructor to determine whether or not they have the necessary preparation for joining this semester.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice Elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an Elective.

Gary Knight is a renowned photojournalist whose work – from South East Asia to Yugoslavia to Iraq and Afghanistan – has been published, exhibited and honored around the world. He is a founding member of the VII Photo Agency, dispatches magazine, and the Angkor Photo Festival. He is currently the Tufts' Institute for Global Leadership's Exposure INSPIRE Fellow.

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EXP-0052-S. Using the Web: The Art of Digital Story Telling
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Who'd have thought, twenty years ago, that the web would become a major tool for narrative? Well, it has!

This course is a combination of analysis and hands-on workshops -- examining the relationships among digital media and photography, graphics, audio, film, and video, while providing students with production opportunities.

It will focus on digital technique and theory, including interactivity and non-linearity, and will employ a variety of multimedia tools.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice Elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an Elective.

Tatyana Bronstein is an independent filmmaker and professor of Visual Arts and Media at Emerson College. Her new documentary, Prima (2013), was screened in the 42nd Dance on Camera Festival at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, this past February. She holds an M.F.A. in Media Arts and a Master's degree in Visual Arts from Emerson College.

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EXP-0056-CS. Making Movies
Tuesday/Thursday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

What does it take to be a filmmaker? Are you ready to make the commitment?

This course will immerse students in the practice and logic associated with camera, lighting, audio and editing – all in the service of learning how to tell a story cinematically. Working in teams, students will complete a series of small projects aimed at developing their technical and stylistic skills. At the same time, they will engage in analyses of filmmakers whose styles and methods are not far removed from that of the class. The teams will then produce original short features, the last of which will be exhibited in a public screening at semester's end.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice Elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an Elective.

HIGH DEMAND. In order to be considered for enrollment, you MUST attend the first class meeting at 6:30pm on Thursday, January 15, in Braker 001.

Don Schechter (A '01, M '03) is the founder of Charles River Media Group, a Boston-based production company. Since 2003 he has worked with clients including ESPN, The New York Times, NBC, and Major League Soccer. As a director and producer his work has appeared in both film and television. He recently launched Pizza Baby Films Inc., an agency dedicated to fostering independent and local film initiatives He is currently the writer and director of the Ascendants film series.

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EXP-0057-CS. Inside Women's Magazines: From Ladies Home Journal to Bitch and Beyond
Monday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Women's magazines are some of the highest-circulation publications in the country with a robust count of ad pages, yet they have long been denied respect and accused of not producing "serious" journalism. This new course will examine women's magazines and their formula, their history back to the 1870s, their role in society and women's movements, and their future in print and online.

Our focus will be all national publications tailored to women—from fashion magazines such as Vogue to service titles like Ladies Home Journal and O, The Oprah Magazine to feminist offering such as Ms. and Bitch. We will examine the publishing formula these magazines have in common, their look, their challenges, their editors-in-chief, their readers, and their embrace of digital media. We will explore these publications' role in popular culture and in movements concerning Obamacare, abortion, women in combat, equal pay, and other issues. This course will incorporate both academic and practical learning components, allowing students to earn an intimate understanding of what it's like to work for a women's magazine and be ready to pitch story ideas and even launch a publication of your own.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice.

Susanne Althoff is the editor of The Boston Globe Magazine; she joined in 2003 as part of an effort to relaunch the publication and bring in female readers age 18-34. While at the Globe, Susanne also launched and served as the editorial director of Lola, a free women's magazine distributed throughout Greater Boston. Susanne was also the executive editor of Natural Health, a women's health and fitness magazine. She received her Master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

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EXP-0058-CS. Social Marketing
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Do we sell ideas the same way we hawk iPads? Are identical emotional strings pulling us to choose a president as to purchase an Impreza over a Prius? Are memes really the genes of our moral, social and cultural constructs? In our media saturated environment, the same tactics that create consumer lust, can also make us care about and invest in social causes, belief systems and political ideologies.

We will explore why this is so through the theories that underlie the art of mass persuasion. But we will also learn by working for six local non-profit organizations. Students will form teams that will each operate as a real-world marketing consultant to its non-profit "client." They will analyze their clients' communications and marketing goals and produce a customized marketing communications plan that includes both strategies and tactics such as logos, web pages, print materials, digital media, or event and outreach concepts. Each class will include analyses of websites, advertisements and various campaigns. Guest speakers from the industry will add their perspective.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice Elective.

Gail Bambrick is Senior Marketing Communications Writer at Tufts. She uses the written word and strategic planning to focus Tufts' identity and messaging in online, print and web communications. She has also been Director of Publications and Associate Director of Communications and Public Relations for the university, as well as the News Media and Public Relations Manager for the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She earned her Ph.D. at Tufts in American literature.

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EXP-0059-S. Lights, Camera, Cry: Emotion in Film
Tuesday/Thursday, 6:00-7:15
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading

Have you ever cried at a movie? What was the last TV show that made you laugh?

In this combined film production and analysis course, we will explore how filmmakers employ visual composition, lighting, editing, music, as well as story, plot, and character to direct an audience's emotion. Students will produce several creative film projects including a final short film. They will also improve their film analysis capabilities, their proficiency producing their own films, and their familiarity with a number of great movies.

Sofia Adams is a junior major in International Letters and Visual Studies. She is currently collaborating on a number of filmmaking projects at Tufts.

Max Bienstock is a senior majoring in English. He has written film criticism and worked in film programming at the Museum of the Moving Image in Queens, New York.

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EXP-0062-S. The Politics and Globalization of the Gulf Arab States
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

The course focuses on the globalization, domestic politics and the international relations of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) States, a regional bloc comprising Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, Oman, Bahrain, and the United Arab Emirates. We will trace the complex interplay between domestic changes occurring in those states due to modernizing forces and their interactions on the global stage.

The course is organized in three sections. The first section introduces students to the region's modern history and institutional structure by examining state formation, the role of oil in changing societies, the nature of political power and legitimacy, attempts at state reforms, the rentier model and the transformative events of the Gulf Wars. The second section delves deeper into the key determinants of Gulf States' politics: the role and influence of Wahhabi Islam, the fight against terrorism, the Gulf's collective security, the Gulf-US strategic alliance and their foreign policies objectives. The last section concludes with the region's recent major policy debates: the Gulf's policy responses to Iran's nuclear ambitions, the reaction to the 'Arab Spring' turmoil, and the various internal and external challenges.

Mohannad Al-Suwaidan is a Ph.D. student at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. His dissertation research focuses on political institutions in natural resource economies. Previously, he worked at the International Islamic Trade Finance Corporation and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Kuwait City, Kuwait.

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EXP-0064-S. Ethics in Human Subjects Research
Monday, 6:00-8:30
0.5 Course Credit, Pass/Fail Grading

This course is being offered as a pilot course for a study in research ethics and methodology to undergraduate and graduate students who plan to conduct independent research studies with human subjects. The objective of the course is to prepare students for the challenges faced in domestic and international research, and to provide a framework for how to deal with these individual challenges in their own research. The class will be case study and project based in order to reinforce the importance of conducting research with integrity and in an objective way while recognizing the unique characteristics of various methodological approaches.

The course will guide students through ethics in research and case studies on research misconduct. Students will learn how to design a methodologically sound project that supports research concepts using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies; the difference between anonymity and confidentiality; and how these concepts apply to the protection of their data. Using each of these topics, they will construct a research prospectus that will adhere to IRB regulations.

PLEASE NOTE: THIS COURSE STARTS ON JANUARY 26, 2015.

Lara Sloboda is the Institutional Review Board Administrator for Tufts' Social, Behavioral, and Educational IRB. In addition to her role in the Office for the Vice Provost for Research, she is a lecturer in the department of Psychology at Tufts and has taught both Introduction to Psychology as well as Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences. She holds a Ph.D. in Psychology from Tufts.

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EXP-0072-S. Illegal: Undocumented Latin@s
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Given the intensity of feeling expressed on all sides of the "immigration issue," is conflict inevitable and consensus possible?

Academe provides a forum for the development of an analytic framework to approach this divisive issue of undocumented migration, into and within the United States, and to encourage its information from proponents and opponents of immigration, rarely if ever are undocumented migrants themselves given a voice in this discussion. With historical, political, sociological, anthropological, psychological, cinematic, secondary and primary sources, students will learn about the phenomenon of undocumented immigration from the perspective of the undocumented immigrant.

Robert LeRoux Hernandez practices law in Massachusetts, primarily employment law, and he has been in positions of leadership in national, state, and local bar organizations. He received his J.D. from Harvard Law School.

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EXP-0074-F. Famous Trials in U.S. History

Thursday, 6:00-8:30
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Famous trials act as a mirror held up to society, in which is reflected the social mores and cultural trends of the time. We can learn much about society, about the tacit assumptions and underlying realities that shaped and were reflected in the trials, through both conscious as well as unconscious testimony. Trials provide us with invaluable unconscious testimony: we can glean what issues are in contention; what things are tacitly agreed upon and therefore not verbalized; what aspects of culture are in flux. Famous trials in particular are useful for the purposes of analyzing an array of historical forces: legal, literary, sociological, psychological, cultural, economic, political, and an almost-infinite number of other potential connections and dependencies. This course does not assume a background in history, law, or any related discipline—you need only have a sense of intellectual curiosity and interest.

Course website & materials >

Ian C. Pilarczyk is the founding Director of the Executive LL.M. in International Business Law at Boston University School of Law. Prior to that, he served as the founding Associate Director of the LL.M. in International Law at the Fletcher School. He received his J.D. from Boston University, and his LL.M. and Doctor of Civil Law degrees from McGill University.

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EXP-0082-S. Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Start Ups
Monday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

You can't walk down the streets of Boston without hearing the buzz about innovation.

In this course, students will explore practices that particular cities, states, and countries have taken to promote innovation. Using Boston's "cleantech cluster" as a case study, they will then outline the ideal features of a city that is a hub for entrepreneurship, looking at both public and private mechanisms for promoting such activities in urban areas. Finally, we will build upon lessons learned about growing entrepreneurial ecosystems by having students draft a proposal and pitch for the formation and long-term sustainability of a yet-to-be-established incubator in the field of their choosing (life sciences, cleantech, fashion, big data, etc).

Sandra Kreis is a 2014 winner of the Entrepreneur's Data Jam, held annually at Google's New York City headquarters during Energy Week. She recently served as the Senior Business Development Manager for the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, a quasi-public agency charged with supporting the clean energy ecosystem across the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. She holds a M.A.L.D. from the Fletcher School at Tufts University, where she co-founded the Fletcher Energy Consortium.

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EXP-0087-S. Microfinance
Monday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

What if you could give $25 to a business owner in an underdeveloped nation and the impact would be that they could feed, educate, and clothe their children for the next 10 months? Would you believe this is possible?

In the world of microfinance anything is possible and extraordinary results can be achieved.

In this course, we'll address how these achievements can be made and we'll take a comprehensive look at microfinance and its impact on people and societies. After forming a solid understanding of the various products offered under the microfinance umbrella (i.e., microcredit, microsavings, microinsurance), we'll collaborate to examine opportunities for domestic and international microfinance initiatives. Students will actively participate in the microfinance market by lending to an actual business owner of their choice, analyzing real-time case studies from around the globe and interacting with Boston-area microloan recipients.

Adam Grenier is a former Fellow with Kiva.org, a leading online microfinance lending community whose mission is to connect people through lending for the sake of alleviating poverty. As a Kiva Fellow, Adam worked with Salone Microfinance Trust (SMT) in Sierra Leone, a non-governmental organization that serves the financial needs of over 6,000 microfinance clients. In 2011, Adam traveled to Colombia to document the impact of microfinance in underdeveloped areas of Barranquilla and Cartagena. Most recently, Adam traveled to Mongolia on behalf of Kiva to research and author a case study on loans distributed to offset air pollution in the capitol city of Ulaanbaatar. He has successfully taught this course a number of times in the Experimental College.

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EXP-0088-S. Understanding The Stock Market: History, Structure, and Impact
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

Over the past three decades, the U.S. stock market has become completely entwined in our economic, political and social landscape. How Wall Street works, why it does certain things, what it represents (especially over the last six years) and how it has entrenched itself into the daily fabric of American life are the cornerstones of this course. With the assistance of technological advancements and the instant dissemination of financial data, the "stockmarketing of America" has moved into the many corners of our globalized society. This course addresses this omnipresence from the simplest stock market mechanisms to the far-reaching effects it has on our daily lives.

Timothy Stratford has had twenty years of experience as a financial services professional at brokerage houses such as Shearson Lehman Brothers and Smith Barney Harris and Upham.

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EXP-0090-S. Teaching a Seminar
ARR
2.0 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

This course is designed for undergraduates who are teaching courses this semester in the Experimental College.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.

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EXP-0090-TS. Teaching Assistant Workshop
ARR
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading

This course is designed for undergraduates who are teaching assistants for courses in the Experimental College.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.

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EXP-0091-S. EPIIC: Russian Redux: Power, Statecraft, and the Global Order
Tuesday/Thursday, 3:00-5:00
1.0 credit, Letter Grading

This two-semester effort will attempt to carefully understand Russian society, and probe its strategic culture, and foreign policy. It will frame this investigation within the broader implications of Russian statecraft for global politics in the 21st century.

This course will study the persistent character of the Tsarist multiethnic imperial state, which at its greatest has covered one sixth of the globe, from the northern Barents Sea to the southern Central Asian steppe, St. Petersburg and the Carpathians in the West to the Pacific Ocean in the east. We will examine the implications of the fact that Russia sits atop the world's largest proven natural gas reserves and second largest pool of oil, and is the only non-democratic regime abutting the resource-rich and rapidly melting Arctic.

Please Note: This course is a continuation of the EPIIC class from last semester.

Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts, and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds an M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

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EXP-0091-AS. Inquiry Teaching Group
ARR
0.5 credits, Letter Grading

Inquiry is a global-issues simulation for high school students, and forms an integral part of the year's activities for EPIIC. Students in this course will help design and enact a simulation on Russia, to be held during the Spring 2014 semester. In the process, students will mentor a high school delegation and prepare them for this simulation — helping them understand all the materials and issues involved.

Heather Barry is the Associate Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.

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EXP-0096-S. Auditing for Breadth
ARR
0.5-1.0 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years as an undergraduate. (One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits.) Please note: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.

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EXP-0099-CS. CMS Internship
ARR
1.0 credits, Pass/Fail Grading

Supervised internship in communications and mass media. Student can intern at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet approved by instructor. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hours a week), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. Registration by consent of instructor. Student should consult with instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For more information, contact the instructor, Leslie Goldberg at leslie.goldberg@tufts.edu.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice Elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an Elective.

Leslie Goldberg (J '84) is the founder of Blue Sun Communications, a corporate communications consulting firm. She holds a M.S. in Mass Communication from Boston University.

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EXP-0101-CS. Advanced Filmmaking
ARR
0.5-1.0 credits, Letter Grading

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who have completed EXP-0056-CS Making Movies – or who are able to demonstrate equivalent competence – can continue their training as filmmakers. Students who initially qualify will present a business plan for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to TuftsFilmWorks' production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. In return, they agree to watch a negotiated number of source films, keep a Producer's Log, and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through to produce their film and their reaction to the film once it is done.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice Elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an Elective.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

Advanced Filmmaking is supported by the generosity of Lisa and Bruce Cohen (J'86 and A'83, respectively).

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.

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EXP-0102-CS. Advanced Digital Media
ARR
0.5-1.0 credits, Letter Grading

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor and for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.

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EXP-0192-S. Independent Study
ARR
Either 0.5 or 1.0 credits, Letter or Pass/Fail Grading

By arrangement only.

Topics must fall within the range of courses taught by the Experimental College. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call 617-627-3384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.

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EXP-0194-CS. CMS Senior Project
ARR
0.5-1.0 credits, Letter Grading

For CMS Minors only. All CMS minors completing their Senior Projects this semester must register for this class.

Julie Dobrow is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.

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95 Talbot Ave., Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155  | Tel: 617-627-3384  | Fax: 617-627-3449  |  Email